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SOW_0331
28 February 2013, 14:29
In the near future, I will be handling a lot of strange movements, changing banks, and relocating all at once. I would like to make sure while I leave behind one life, I'm not getting screwed.

Looking into LifeLock as a monitoring service, I am reading some unpleasant reviews and experiences. Beyond staring at my accounts 24/7, does anyone use an alternative service that they have been happy with?

Polypro
28 February 2013, 14:47
I use Identity Guard. A few months back, a bank called about a loan - that I never requested. Some database somewhere must have gotten popped. An old one, as the address they were using was 15 years old or so. Since I can write it off, I did some research and chose Identity Guard. You get instant access to all 3 of your credit reports, and this *did* help me find 2 more attempts around the same time period, so I handled those via phone/email. It's $18/month...I consider it the price of doing business. There has been zero activity since I joined though, so I haven't seen the service in action. You get a lot of info though, besides credit score.

You can kind of do it on the cheap by freezing your credit with each agency and diligently monitoring all your financial accounts. But if you expect to need credit for something, that method can be a PITA.

http://www.clarkhoward.com/news/clark-howard/personal-finance-credit/credit-freeze-and-thaw-guide/nFbL/

P

SOW_0331
28 February 2013, 14:50
Thanks Poly, that's exactly what I was looking for!

24/7
28 February 2013, 15:14
I froze my credit several years ago, hasn't been an issue. There have been a few occasions that I did a temp thaw, little bit of a pain but not huge.

eta: I had lifelock for 1 year, fired them, I caught weirdness before they did.

catfish
28 February 2013, 23:43
I use Identity Guard as well. Polypro is spot on.

Axman15
1 March 2013, 02:02
If you are a USAA member and want to utilize them as a banking service, they have a useful program that integrates well and seems to do a good job for about $12 per month.

SOW_0331
1 March 2013, 02:05
I actually am, its worth looking into. Never even heard if that, thanks for the heads up.

Check 6
1 March 2013, 11:11
These companies tell you after your credit has been attacked. If you want prevention, lock your credit reporting accounts.

My identity was stolen about two years ago due to a database being hacked in another state. They offered a free plan for a year but it was a joke.

Simply lock your accounts at the three credit reporting agencies (google how to do this) and no one can obtain credit using your name, which is what identity theft is mostly about.

When you need to obtain credit, e.g. a loan or credit card, you can open your account at the specific credit reporting agency that the loan company or cc uses for 24 hours, and then lock it again. Easy smeeshy.

The Lifelock type agencies are a waste of money.

SOW_0331
1 March 2013, 12:11
What about stealing my card info? Three times in the past year I've had to dispute card transactions, which is always a headache.

Will the IdentityGuard do that?

Check 6
1 March 2013, 12:14
What about stealing my card info? Three times in the past year I've had to dispute card transactions, which is always a headache.

Will the IdentityGuard do that?

No, because CC theft takes place at the point of sale, e.g. hotels, restaurants, where an employee steals your info. This is not a situation where someone is obtaining a CC in your name because they obtained your identifying information, name, dob, ssn, and address.

Polypro
1 March 2013, 12:15
Yes. You have the option to enter Credit, Debit, and Checking/Savings account info, to be monitored. I think they hang out in all the shady "carder" forums, to see if your number comes up. Compromised info gets used pretty quick, but like any security it's another layer. I *would* recommend going to your bank, and setting up email/text alerts for any transaction over $1.00 though...if they offer that feature. "Test" charges are usually small. Point of sale *is* a biggie, but ATM Skimmers are big too, and online databases are popped all the time.

Now, it *is* one more database that has your info, so you have to trust that they are up to snuff on security. I play the odds that banks and vendors will get popped before they do, so I enter that info...but it's voluntary.

P

Check 6
1 March 2013, 12:21
Yes. You have the option to enter Credit, Debit, and Checking/Savings account info, to be monitored.,...
P

I stand corrected, but I see little gain here. Reputable CC companies already monitor CC usage for fraud, and reputable CC companies don't charge their customers for fraudulent purchases.

pirana
1 March 2013, 12:45
If you are a USAA member and want to utilize them as a banking service, they have a useful program that integrates well and seems to do a good job for about $12 per month.

I just joined that a little while back; under $10.00/month.

judylynn62002
1 March 2013, 13:01
I would also lock your accounts with the credit reporting agencies. Other safety precautions to prevent ID theft,if you are not already doing them, are to shred your mail with any name/address or account numbers, bank statements, paper credit card receipts with an Acct number or signature, and to always always put outgoing mail in a locked mail facility. Obtain a free credit report every year, and review Acct stmts when they arrive for unauthorized activity. Any disputes need to be bade in no more than 60 days.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Polypro
1 March 2013, 13:03
I stand corrected, but I see little gain here. Reputable CC companies already monitor CC usage for fraud, and reputable CC companies don't charge their customers for fraudulent purchases.

Correct, but check your bank's policy on Debit Card fraud. Some are cool, but some may try to screw you. I also don't know how exactly (or if) a Checking Account and Routing number can be used fraudulently...but they are on every check you write, and pass through a lot of hands.

P

judylynn62002
1 March 2013, 13:10
Correct, but check your bank's policy on Debit Card fraud. Some are cool, but some may try to screw you. I also don't know how exactly (or if) a Checking Account and Routing number can be used fraudulently...but they are on every check you write, and pass through a lot of hands.

P

If you use a debit card be sure to use a financial institution that offers one with the Visa or Master Card logo.

Check fraud usually occurs through using routing/transit/account numbers to produce checks with a fake name/address to match their ID but when processed the funds would come out of your Acct. Can't protect the info during processes of making payments unfortunately, but that is not typically when theft of this info occurs. Most times it is a bank employee that slipped through the hiring process who mines and sells the customer info.

Agoge
1 March 2013, 13:12
I would also lock your accounts with the credit reporting agencies. Other safety precautions to prevent ID theft,if you are not already doing them, are to shred your mail with any name/address or account numbers, bank statements, paper credit card receipts with an Acct number or signature, and to always always put outgoing mail in a locked mail facility. Obtain a free credit report every year, and review Acct stmts when they arrive for unauthorized activity. Any disputes need to be bade in no more than 60 days.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

If you use a debit card be sure to use a financial institution that offers one with the Visa or Master Card logo.

Check fraud usually occurs through using routing/transit/account numbers to produce checks with a fake name/address to match their ID but when processed the funds would come out of your Acct. Can't protect the info during processes of making payments unfortunately, but that is not typically when theft of this info occurs. Most times it is a bank employee that slipped through the hiring process who mines and sells the customer info.

Just out of curiosity, what do you base these two posts on?

judylynn62002
1 March 2013, 13:16
20+ years in the banking industry, first as a regulator then on the banking side in consumer protection.

Agoge
1 March 2013, 13:23
20+ years in the banking industry, first as a regulator then on the banking side in consumer protection.

Thank you!

judylynn62002
1 March 2013, 13:30
Thank you!

Your welcome. BTW thought of something else. You have my wheels spinning. Last thing I promise.

When/if you buy something online and you create a profile on that website, do not save the C/C portion to your record. Reenter that every time you buy something. Prevents your account number info being compromised if the vendors systems are hacked or compromised. If you later get a notice from the vendor that their systems were compromised, change your password immediately.

Polypro
1 March 2013, 14:47
Good info in the Acct/Routing Number scam, thanks.

P