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Ned&StacyFan
9 August 2004, 06:30
Hey All,

A friend of mine just enrolled in an entry-level course on the American Military University website. I perused the curriculum and there were a few courses that looked like they might be worth looking into.
I was wondering if anyone here has taken any of the courses and if so, are they worth it? I was looking to add some of the LE counter-terror courses to my resume.

Thanx,
N&SF

DY
9 August 2004, 16:10
Their number one goal is to profit as much as possible from military tuition assitance. That said, they maintain credibility by hiring people who, for the most part are knowledgeable in their field of instruction. That does not necessarily make them good instructors and professors. But the two I have had were very good and extremely challenging. They are worth a look as far as I'm concerned.

USAFINTEL
10 August 2004, 10:12
AMU is good to go both in being accredited and having quality staff.

A Large majority of the staff there has been in or is currently in the military/Intel community. Several of the Professors I have had also teach at the Joint Military Intelligence College run by DIA and other schools.

I have had no problems transferring any of the courses I have taken there to other schools, nor using military or employer aid to pay for the courses.

I got my BA in Intel Studies there and I am currently doing the MA in Strategic Intel.

Over all the quality of instruction has been very good in the courses I have taken. Lots of reading, lots of assignments including papers and tests.

I would to see them go with a better threaded discussion systems online like what Devry uses, so that the students can interact with each other and the professor.


Over all, I have enjoyed the courses, have stayed intersted in them and have learned a few things. I wish I could say the same about my MBA program.

I've reccomended the school to several people and so far everyone has liked the school and the courses.

BFV MG
10 August 2004, 13:11
I have taken 27 sem hours and was very pleased with the curriculum and the professors. Most make it challenging and you actually learn from the courses. All the professors I had worked with my scheudle when I couldnt meet a deadline due to deployment or confilcts with my work scheudle. Most are all prior service and fully understandn when you have a schedule conflict and will work with you, just let them know whaed of time I would suggest them to anyone. This is one of the Universities I have had my soldiers enroll into during the deployment. If you dont have TA the cost is what hurts you pocket book.

USAFINTEL
10 August 2004, 13:15
For active duty they pay 100% for undergrad between TA and the school had a grant for the 25% difference plus free books.

For the reserves I had to pay upfront and then got reimbursed.

I believe they also do the GI BIll Top off program.

As far as online courses go they are pretty reasonable in price.

I've paid over 1500 from a single online graduate course before.

60 Driver
17 August 2004, 21:21
I've taken about 30 hours with them in a MA PoliSci curriculum, and I've been very pleased with the experience.

mkirk
27 August 2004, 16:24
AMU holds National accreditation from the Distance Education Training Council (DETC) and not Regional accreditation (there is a difference). The DETC is recognized by the Federal Department of Education. If you are looking at a graduate program later on, make sure they'll take the credits.

That said, I graduated from a Nationally accredited B.S. program and was accepted into a masters program at a regionally accredited school. But not all universities accept credits from DETC institutions. Just a heads-up. However, I've heard good things about AMU and would probably choose that school if I had it to do again.

DY
27 August 2004, 16:34
AMU is in the final stages of regional acreditation.

OSU
27 August 2004, 17:16
AMU can be very effective if you use it correctly. I am working on my MA in Military History and it is challenging, but offers you the time to do the work on your time frame and offers a wide selection of courses to take. The professors are usually military personnel, depending on your field of study, and are willing to work w/ you on getting assignments in if you are going to be late w/ something. They "courses" can be a bitch at times too.

Ned&StacyFan
28 August 2004, 02:51
Just wanted to say thanx to everyone who threw their .02 cents in. I'm going to get myself set up here in the next few weeks, the only question now is where to start, I'm interested in the terrorism angle, but I've also been searching for intel courses that deal with developing sources and gathering product from same (Tradecraft, if you will) Once I can find that, Ill be happy. Anyway, for those of you who are taking the courses there good luck.

Cheers,
N&SF

grannyapple
23 September 2004, 15:36
AMU is a great school. I have just completed its MA in National Security Studies, with a regional concentration in the Middle East. The courses are challenging, and the professors are all 'scholar-practitioners' - very few ivory tower types at this school. Yes, they are not yet regionally accredited, but this is more of a reflection on the difficultly of traditional institutions to recognize entirely distance or 'virtual' universities. I expect AMU to become fully accredited within the next 12 months or so. Some professors are better at fully utilizing the virtual classroom than others, but ultimately it is like any other school - lots of reading, lots of writing, and some tests. There are precious few schools at all with degrees in security studies, let alone strategic intelligence or military history. AMU was way ahead of the curve in offering high-quality training in intelligence and terrorism - other schools (Hopkins, Georgetown) are playing catch-up. If you are deployed and have the time, or (like me) simply interested in these academic fields, you can do no better than AMU. back to lurking....

ps - while studying intelligence can be a fruitful exercise, and I have done this at AMU - don't expect to learn 'tradecraft' as such. Predictive methodologies, intelligence processes, and how they intersect with policymakers are more the norm. Good luck.

FlyHalf
25 September 2004, 03:14
Question: (I know it's all relative but..) While serving on active duty as enlisted or as an officer what are people's experiences with being able to take AMU Classes in regards to time. Can sufficient time be devoted to classes while performing your duties?.. Do you need approval from senior officers before enrollment? Is it encouraged?... Thanks!

CV
26 September 2004, 14:47
Im riding the EarmyU shortbus... AMU classes will be taken after deployment when I get back CONUS.

Depends on your job, duties, taskings... I am a commo guy who monitors networks and signal equiptment. Therefore, I have unlimited high-speed internet access 24/7 with a lot of time on my hands... If I was 100% dedicated to school I could probably pump out 3 classes a semester. All this under deployment.

Back in garrison I can manage 2 classes easily, but then again only thing that gets in the way is jumps and going to the field.

I can't speak for other MOS's or CMF's...

Hawkeye
26 September 2004, 23:03
I am just finishing up with two classes at Campbell University on Ft Bragg. It has killed me. Working all day plus married with children, and going to school makes for no free time whatsoever. I have been plugging away since 1993 and I can finally see a light at the end of the tunnel. I only need 8 classes for my BBA. Which is reallly the only thing holding me up from retiring. Once I have that piece of paper that sdays I have an education, I will think hard about hanging up my beret.

Sharky
26 September 2004, 23:53
Originally posted by Hawkeye
I am just finishing up with two classes at Campbell University on Ft Bragg. It has killed me. Working all day plus married with children, and going to school makes for no free time whatsoever. I have been plugging away since 1993 and I can finally see a light at the end of the tunnel. I only need 8 classes for my BBA. Which is reallly the only thing holding me up from retiring. Once I have that piece of paper that sdays I have an education, I will think hard about hanging up my beret.


I feel your pain. I take a full class load every semester, 5 semesters per year, and work full time as well. That means that a semster ends on a saturday and the next semester starts the following day. Definitely cuts down on the fun and free time. I'm getting burned out but I only have about a year left. As someone else said, only 5 klicks to go. Then there's the Master's degree challenge waiting.

Tracy
27 September 2004, 12:16
Hold hard guys and girls. The degree can make all the difference.