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Dave76
8 April 2005, 11:48
I'm currently researching combat jumps in the time after the end of WW2 to the present.

I know about a combat jump of the 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry, 173rd Airborne Brigade during "Operation Junction City" in Vietnam.

Was this the only combat jump in that conflict?

Doogie320
8 April 2005, 12:33
S/L? That was the only mass jump, if you can call it a combat jump. IIRC SF had secured the DZ for that Op before the 173rd jumped in.

SF teams did some S/L inserts and there is the attached document concerning HALO jumps by MACV-SOG.

SOTB
8 April 2005, 12:49
The Corps had confirmed TWO and "maybe" a third....

Dave76
8 April 2005, 15:40
Thanks sofar!

@Southoftheborder:

Date: 5 September 1967
Unit: USMC, 1st Force Recon
Operation: Oregon
Troopers: 10
Country: Vietnam
Drop zone: South
Aircraft: USAF C-7 Caribou
Type Air delivery: Night personnel, static-line jump tail gate jump

Were you refering to this jump? What's the second confirmed one?


@Doogie320:

What is S/L?

Doogie320
8 April 2005, 16:18
@Doogie320:

What is S/L?

Static line.

LRS Guy
9 April 2005, 01:30
I do believe III MSF ie III Corp "Mike Force" conducted 3 combat parachute jumps.

Bunard SF Camp 2 Apr 67
Nau Gai Mountains 13 May 67
7 Mountains Area 17 Nov 68

II Mike Force
Bu Prang SF Camp 5 Oct 67

CCS did at least 1 S/L insert in Cambodia. I had several beers with the 1-1 (APL) a few months ago.

ARVN Airborne did a few but I'd have to dig into my books to find the dates & locations. I believe it was US Advisor Team 70 was assigned to the ARVN Airborne Division...


I want to say there was a book called "Called Inside Force Recon" that talked about the 3 FR S/L inserts. Maybe a LTC Michael Lee Lanning & Major "Doc" Norton USMC ret wrote it. I'm not sure.

Hope that helps

SOTB
9 April 2005, 02:19
Frank Norbury is mentioned in the above article. Was he a HALO instructor at Bragg in the mid 80's?

LRS Guy
9 April 2005, 13:30
Yes he was. I believe he was killed in the late 90's on a jump from a C-47 at the HALO school.

Trip_Wire
9 April 2005, 13:55
I was wondering if any of the jumps done in Vietnam, outside of the one by the 173rd were awarded a star on the wings? I have never heard of any others being awarded except that one. I think the way the regs are written, it is hard to define a combat jump and be awarded the star.

Also, do Marines even have a method of indicating a combat jump on their wings? They don't have any senior or master wings that I know of.

SOTB
9 April 2005, 14:11
Yes he was. I believe he was killed in the late 90's on a jump from a C-47 at the HALO school.Then I am sure he was an instructor in my HALO class, but I'm not sure if he was with us in my HALO Jumpmaster class. Didn't he have a son who was ALSO an instructor there? Came over from behind the fence?

RangerRuss
9 April 2005, 14:33
x

LRS Guy
9 April 2005, 22:21
When I spoke the 1-1 from RT Auger he told me he did get a star for his wings. Also I believe that when HALO wings were authorized the SOG HALO guys were awarded stars. Cannot remember who told me that.

If interested there is a chapter in John Plaster's book SOG that talks specfically about the abn. insertions SOG did. There were even some ARVN led HALO insertions as well.

There was a book by Shelby Stanton on the 1st Cav Divison's ops in VN. In the appendix it mentioned the Cav's Pathfinder Det. did several parachute ops in support of air assults though I have never seen it confirmed anywhere else.

shark11
10 April 2005, 05:04
The Marine Corps does not have an insignia for combat jumps per se, the gold wings parachutist wings are awarded for 5 specific types of jumps after jump school, 90 days in a jump billet, etc. However a lead sleder could make his first jump after airborne school in combat and be awarded gold wings automatically. This has been going on with 1st Recon Bn in Iraq.\

Not sure how many combat jumps the Marine Corps made in Vietnam but I read a story about a daytime combat jump, got realy ugly, one of the jumpers ( I think his name was Blackburn, not sure tho) was awarded a silver star.

Did the SEALS or PJ's make any combat jumps? You think this type of information would have been recorded a little better, sounds like an interesting project

teriyakisaki
10 April 2005, 05:34
Did the SEALS or PJ's make any combat jumps? You think this type of information would have been recorded a little better, sounds like an interesting project

im not claiming to be an expert or anything, so dont quote me on it, but i dont believe SEALs did. the SEALs primarily operated via PBR and STAB's as that fit their AO the best. i know it was mentioned in "good to go" but the mission was later scratched. IIRC, the father of the SEALs, roy boehm did make at least one combat jump with his LDNN force towards the end of his tour. ill have to check his book. that would probably be the only instance in which a SEAL made a combat jump in vietnam.

shark11
10 April 2005, 05:38
That brings up a good point, I think I read a book about 1stSgt Hamblin, an amputee who jumped in Vietnam, I think he was with MAC-V SOG then, I'm sure more combat jumps were made by guys on loan to the "agency" but of course there may not be an easy way of looking that up

Dave76
10 April 2005, 15:48
I just found this on a page called Gavin's Paratroopers (http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/7963/paratrooper.htm) :


Date: 2 April 1967
Unit: 5th Special Force Group (ABN), 1st Special Forces: CIDG Detachments, A-503 Mike Force & A-344, Operation Harvest Moon (Includes Montagnards)
Operation: Harvest Moon
Troopers: 300
Country: Vietnam
Drop zone: Bunard, Phouc Long "Happy Dragon" Province
Aircraft: C-123 Providers
Type Air delivery: Day Mass low-level tactical personnel static-line jump


Date: 13 May 1967 Unit: Mobile Strike Force (Mike Force), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne): Detachment A-503, Co's. 3, 4 & 5; 4.2 inch Heavy Mortar platoon & Hdqts. group. Water jump (0600 hrs.) at 700 ft.
Operation: Blackjack
Troopers: 486
Country: Vietnam (SW corner)
Drop zone: Seven Mountains ( Near Chi Lang, 1km S of Nuai Yai) Aircraft: C-123 Providers
Type Air delivery: Day Mass low-level tactical personnel static-line jump


Date: 5 October 1967
Unit: 5th Special Force Group (ABN), 1st Special Forces: Pathfinder Detachment (12 SF, 37 ARVN Pathfinders), Co's 24 & 25, Detachment B-20, "B" Co II CTZ (Pleiku) Mike Force (50 SF) & 275 LLDB (Includes Montagnards)
Operation: Blue Max
Troopers: 374 with ARVN and Aussie Paras
Country: Vietnam
Drop zone: Bu Prang CIDG fighting camp, Quang Duc "Great Virtue" Province
Aircraft: C-130 Hercules
Type Air delivery: Day Mass low-level tactical personnel static-line jump

Date: 1968-73?
Unit: Military Assistance Command Vietnam, Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG)Airborne Studies Group (SOG 36)
Operation: Eldest Son, Italian Green, Pole Bean
Troopers: ? to sabotage enemy ammunition supply
Country: North Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia
Drop zone: ?
Aircraft: C-130 Hercules or MC-130 Combat Talon
Type Air delivery: Night, High-Altitude, Low-Opening (HALO) jump

Date: Three in 1970-71
Unit: Op 35, Command & Control North (CCN), Studies & Observation Group (SOG), High Altitude Low Opening team (HALO). Formerly classified.
Troopers: Country: North Vietnam Drop Zones: Ho Chi Minh Trail Aircraft: C-130 Hercules Type Air delivery: Night High Altitude Low-Opening (HALO)jump Jumped at 21,000 feet with oxygen, between 0001-0300 hours. Objective to close the Ho Chi Minh trail to NVA by calling in air strikes. Individually extracted by V rings on STABO harnesses worn by team members by helicopter lowering ropes/bridles using the STABO(Stabilized Tactical Airborne Operation) system.
Operation: Team Florida. 9 troopers. Nov. 1970
Operation: Team Alaska. 9 troopers. Feb. 1971
Operation: Team One Zero. 4 troopers. 15 April 1971
Also 13 separate static-line jumps.

keller
29 April 2005, 17:13
Date: Three in 1970-71
Unit: Op 35, Command & Control North (CCN), Studies & Observation Group (SOG), High Altitude Low Opening team (HALO). Formerly classified.
Troopers: Country: North Vietnam Drop Zones: Ho Chi Minh Trail Aircraft: C-130 Hercules Type Air delivery: Night High Altitude Low-Opening (HALO)jump Jumped at 21,000 feet with oxygen, between 0001-0300 hours. Objective to close the Ho Chi Minh trail to NVA by calling in air strikes. Individually extracted by V rings on STABO harnesses worn by team members by helicopter lowering ropes/bridles using the STABO(Stabilized Tactical Airborne Operation) system.
Operation: Team Florida. 9 troopers. Nov. 1970
Operation: Team Alaska. 9 troopers. Feb. 1971
Operation: Team One Zero. 4 troopers. 15 April 1971
Also 13 separate static-line jumps.


Some very brave men with big brass one's IMHO. Plus the crews that flew in to do the extract.

LRS Guy
1 May 2005, 12:06
I was going through some of my older books and magazines. Came across this note. "

The French Parachute forces are estimated to to carried out over 60 parachute operations in the first Indo-China War."

But they didn't have the helo assets we did ether.

Dave76
9 May 2005, 09:47
Concerning french combat jumps after WW 2 I came across this list:

French Combat Jumps 1946-1978.

Based on two books by Bragg and Turner.

1946.

24-4 Laos DemiBrigade SAS.
13-5 Laos DemiBrigade SAS.
8-8 Cambodia DemiBrigade SAS.
25-11 Indochina DemiBrigade SAS.

1947.

5-1 Indochina DemiBrigade SAS.
20-3 Indochina DemiBrigade SAS.
23-3 Laos II/1 RCP.
3-4 Laos DemiBrigade SAS.
10-4 Indochina DemiBrigade SAS.
15-4 Indochina I/1 RCP.
22-4 Indochina III/1 RCP.
24-4 Madagascar 6 coy de marche para.
2-5 Indochina
3-5 Madagascar 6 coy de marche para.
13-5 Indochina I/1 RCP, 1 BPChoc.
15-5 Madagascar 6 coy de marche para.
30-5 Indochina DemiBrigade SAS.
27-6 Indochina III/1 RCP.
7-7 Madagascar 6 coy de marche para.
7/8/9-10 Indochina Airborne Brigade.
26-11 Indochina I/1 RCP.
26-11 Indochina III/1 RCP.
25-12 Cambodia DemiBrigade SAS.

1948.

7-1 Indochina I/1 RCP.
11-1 Indochina 2 BCCP.
23-1 Indochina 1 BPChoc.
8-2 Indochina 1 BPChoc.
14-2 Indochina 1 BCCP, 2 BCCP.
18-2 Indochina I/1 RCP.
5-3 Indochina 1 BPChoc.
7-2 Indochina Parachute Battalion.
21-4 Indochina 1 BCCP.
26-4 Indochina Para coy 3 REI.
30-4 Indochina 2 BCCP.
1-6 Indochina 1 BCCP.
9-6 Indochina Para coy 3 REI.
7-7 Indochina 2 BCCP.
12-7 Indochina 2 BCCP.
17-7 Indochina 2 BCCP, 5 BCCP.
31-7 Indochina 2 BCCP, 5 BCCP.
5-8 Indochina 2 BCCP.
16-8 Indochina 2 BCCP.
9-10 Indochina Para coy 3 REI.
17-10 Indochina I/1 RCP.
24-10 Indochina I/1 RCP.
7-11 Indochina I/1 RCP.
15-11 Indochina Para coy 3 REI.
28-11 Indochina 2 BCCP.
7-12 Indochina I and II/1 RCP.
24-11 Indochina 5 BCCP.

1949.

7-1 Indochina Muong Partisans.
19-1 Indochina 3 BCCP.
30-1 Indochina II/1 RCP.
15-2 Indochina II/1 RCP.
7-2 Indochina 2 BCCP.
4-3 Indochina 2 BCCP.
12-3 Indochina 3 CIP.
18-3 Indochina 1 BEP.
24-3 Cambodia 2 BEP.
10-4 Indochina 3 BCCP.
12-4 Indochina 3 BCCP and Muong Partisans.
19-4 Indochina 3 BCCP.
29-4 Indochina 1 BEP.
30-4 Indochina 5 BCCP.
2-5 Indochina II/1 RCP.
7-5 Indochina II/1 RCP, 1 BEP.
19-5 Indochina 2 BCCP.
27-5 Indochina Muong Partisans.
2-6 Laos 2 BCCP.
8-6 Madagascar GCCP Madagascar.
16-6 Indochina 2 BEP.
29-6 Indochina 2 BCCP.
17-7 Indochina Muong Partisans.
27-7 Indochina Muong Partisans.
18-8 Indochina 5 BCCP, 1 BEP.
17-8 Indochina 2 BCCP.
26-9 Indochina 2 BCCP.
13-10 Indochina 2 BCCP.
14-10 Indochina 1 BEP.
16-10 Indochina II/1 RCP, 3 and 5 CIP.
16-11 Indochina 2 BEP, 2 BCCP.
27-11 Indochina 1 BEP.
28-11 Indochina DBCCP.
23-12 Indochina 5 BCCP.
26-12 Indochina Base South.

1950.

11-1 Indochina 6 BCCP.
26-1 Indochina 1 BCCP.
11-2 Indochina 3 BCCP.
20-2 Indochina 1 BCCP.
24-2 Indochina 3 BCCP, 5 BCCP.
29-3 Indochina Base South.
31-3 Indochina 1 BCCP.
20-3 Indochina 1 BEP.
21-5 Indochina 2 BEP and Para Medics.
22-5 Indochina 6 BCCP.
27-5 Indochina 3 BCCP.
11-6 Indochina 3 BCCP.
20-6 Indochina 6 BCCP.
20-6 Indochina 2 BEP and Para Medics.
4-8 Laos 3 BCCP.
1-9 Laos 3 BCCP.
4-9 Indochina 6 BCCP.
16-9 Indochina Tho and Nhung Partisans.
17-9 Indochina 1 BEP.
19-9 Indochina 7 BCCP, 10 BPCP.
23-9 Indochina 2 BEP.
27-8 Indochina 10 BPCP.
1-10 Indochina 3 BCCP, 7 GCCP.
8-10 Indochina 3 BCCP, 1 BEP.
26-10 Indochina 1 GCCP.
24-11 Indochina 2 BEP.
30-12 Indochina 6 GCCP.

1951.

1-1 Indochina 7 BCCP.
9-3 Indochina DemiBrigade Colonial Paras.
30-5 Indochina 7 BPC.
12-6 Indochina 7 CIP.
8-8 Indochina 2 BEP.
9-8 Indochina 2 BEP.
30-8 Indochina GCMA.
2-10 Indochina 8 BPChoc.
4-10 Indochina 2 BEP.
6-10 Indochina 10 BPCP.
10-11 Indochina 1 BEP.
14-11 Indochina 1, 2 and 7 BPC.
26-11 Indochina 7 BPC.
11-12 Indochina 10 BPCP.
23-12 Indochina 1 BPVN.

1952.

8-1 Indochina 2 BPC.
25-3 Indochina 7 BPC.
25-4 Indochina 1 BPVN.
11-5 Laos 1 CCPL.
15-5 Indochina 1 BPVN.
28-5 Laos 1 CCPL.
15-6 Indochina 1 BPVN.
4-9 Indochina 3 BPC.
11-10 Indochina 3 BPC.
16-10 Indochina 6 BPC.
9-11 Indochina 1 and 2 BEP, 3 BPC.
3-12 Indochina 8 BPChoc.
12-12 Indochina 8 BPChoc.
15-12 Laos 1 BPL.
27-12 Thailand 6 BPC, 1 BPVN.

1953.

18-1 Indochina 3 BPC.
15-2 Indochina GCMA.
21-3 Indochina GCMA.
16-4 Indochina 3 BPC.
21-4 Indochina 8 BPChoc.
1-5 Indochina GCMA.
2-5 Indochina GCMA.
17-7 Indochina 2 BEP, 2 BPC, 8 BPChoc.
28-7 Indochina II/1 RCP, 3 BPVN.
30-7 Indochina GCMA.
7-8 Indochina GCMA.
6-10 Indochina GCMA Meo Guerillas.
1-11 Indochina GCMA.
19-11 Indochina GCMA.
20-11 Indochina 1 BPC, II/1 RCP, 1 BEP, 5 BPVN, 8 BPChoc.

1954.

1-3 Indochina 3rd Airborne Group.
13-3 Indochina 1 BPC, II/1 RCP, 2 BEP, 6 BPC, 5 BPVN.
6-5 Indochina GCMA.
8-5 Indochina GCMA.
7-7 Indochina GCMA.
30-12 Algeria 2 RCP.

1955.

4-7 Algeria 6 RPC.
19-8 Morocco 6 RPC.

1956.

6-4 Algeria 1 REP.
18-5 Algeria 1 REP.
9-6 Algeria 1 REP.
11-6 Algeria 2 REP.
22-6 Algeria 2 REP.
4-7 Algeria 6 RPC.
5-11 Suez 1 RPC, 2 RPC.
8-11 Algeria 14 RCP.
20-12 Cameroun 4 GCCP.

1957.

24-1 Mauritania 4 GCCP.
22-3 Algeria 20 GAP.
18-6 Algeria 9 RCP.
21-11 Algeria 3 RPC.
3-12 Algeria 3 RPC.
7-12 Algeria 3 RPC.

1958.

11-2 Morocco 7 RPC.
30-4 Algeria 1 REP.

1959.

22-7 Algeria 6 RPIM.

1960.

8-1 Algeria 3 RPC.

1961.

19-7 Tunisia 2 RPIM.

1964.

18-2 Gabon

1978.

19-5 Kolwezi, Zaire 2 REP.
20-5 Kolwezi, Zaire 2 REP.


That's pretty astounding isn't it ?!

Source (http://cervens.net/legionbbs/showthread.php?t=580)

LRS Guy
10 May 2005, 00:29
Thats a WHOLE lot of jumps!

Sltwtr1
10 May 2005, 01:51
I'm currently researching combat jumps in the time after the end of WW2 to the present.

I know about a combat jump of the 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry, 173rd Airborne Brigade during "Operation Junction City" in Vietnam.

Was this the only combat jump in that conflict?


Are you interested in the Vietnam conflict as a whole, ie; jumps in Cambodia also, or just Vietnam? Are you including/interested in jumps made by PJ's?

Sharky
10 May 2005, 03:19
Then I am sure he was an instructor in my HALO class, but I'm not sure if he was with us in my HALO Jumpmaster class. Didn't he have a son who was ALSO an instructor there? Came over from behind the fence?


Yes.....he was FIST at A/3/75 while I was there. Good dude. His old man was the God of MFF.

C-M-R
11 May 2005, 14:20
Yes.....he was FIST at A/3/75 while I was there. Good dude. His old man was the God of MFF.

Slight hijack -

Frank Jr was in 3/7 with Chuck. I don't recall him going over to the dark side. Maybe though. When his dad was killed it was like the whole community felt a stunned disbelief. A true legend passed.

Here's part of one of the articles from the Fayetteville paper.

The younger Norbury, who is a former military free-fall instructor, said his father was a hero who wanted to create other heroes.

``My dad loved nothing more than teaching,'' he said. ``That was the fuel for his fire everyday.''

The day after Norbury died, his son took his place, leading his students on a free-fall jump.

Norbury's son said his father would always be alive as long as he is remembered by family and friends. ``He will live forever in all of us.''

Retired Sgt. Maj. David Clark said Norbury helped develop the Army's high-altitude, low-opening method of free-fall parachuting.

Clark said a commander once ordered Norbury to apply for officer candidate school. Norbury applied, but pulled the paperwork when the commander went to another assignment, he said.

``He felt he could do more for the Army teaching (non-commissioned officer) business,'' Clark said.

Emory Goodman, pastor of Cliffdale Christian Center where Norbury attended, said, ``All of us who knew Frank, knew that he was a hero.''

Norbury, who became a civilian instructor at the Special Forces Military Free-fall School in 1987, made more than 6,000 parachute jumps. He joined the Army in 1948 when he was 16, using his brother's name because he was too young.

After serving as an infantry soldier in Korea, Norbury went to Airborne Infantry School, returning to Korea in 1957 with the 7th Infantry Division. He graduated from Special Forces School in 1963.

Norbury served with the 8th Special Forces Group in Panama in 1964, with the 5th Special Forces Group in Vietnam in 1966 and the 10th Special Forces Group in Germany in 1967.

In 1970, Norbury organized a military free-fall school in Vietnam to support combat operations. He trained Special Operations personnel to conduct combat free-fall jumps into hostile areas. He retired in 1975.

Norbury's awards included the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster and ``V'' Device for valor, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster and two Purple Hearts. He earned the Combat Infantryman's Badge, Master Parachutist Badge, Pathfinder Badge, Ranger tab and Special Forces tab.

Thursday, December 9, 1993

Doogie320
11 May 2005, 14:46
Slight hijack - Norbury, who became a civilian instructor at the Special Forces Military Free-fall School in 1987, made more than 6,000 parachute jumps.

More hijack:

I'd wager that more than half of those jumps were under rounds. For those of you that don't know the early skydiving pioneers took surplus military static line rigs and modifed them them for freefall. Primarily they had to work out a new deployment method.

Here's the interesting part: those early canopies needed modifications. You wonder where the slots on the modern MC1-1B/C chutes came from? Guys like Mr. Norbury (sorry, I don't have his rank handy) would take their surplus canopies and literally cut holes in them and bind the edges with 100 mph tape before packing them and jumping them. They WERE the test dummies. Also, there weren't many guys to make a ton of jumps since that whole landing under a round thing took a toll on the knees and back.

Those early guys are studs. Always will be to me.

SOTB
11 May 2005, 14:49
Norbury's awards included the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster and ``V'' Device for valor....It guys like Mr. Norbury that remind you of how a Bronze Star does, in-fact, signify something special (no matter that someone else might have gotten one for loading ammo on a bird thousands of miles away from the problem).

I remember him as a pretty cool dude. He jumped with my group (the light-asses), although he wasn't my instructor. His son was pretty cool as well. I remember talking with him about a jump he did one night onto the roof of the White House (not THAT WH, but the old building there at SWC), and how his major concern was grabbing ANYTHING to hold onto once he touched down (so as to not continue off the side of the roof with a non/partially inflated canopy)....

SOTB
11 May 2005, 14:53
....that whole landing under a round thing took a toll on the knees and back.No shit. And I still believe that the opening shock under freefall is worse with a round. I only jumped 4 rounds in freefall (in HALO school), but it was more than enough. My last jump had my harness incorrectly situated and my right testicle was trapped. NOT cool. Its CLEARLY a possible cause of cancer.:DThose early guys are studs. Always will be to me.Ditto....

C-M-R
11 May 2005, 14:54
He was a Sgt Maj. Cool info Doogie. You never cease to amaze me.

Doogie320
11 May 2005, 15:06
I don't have Poynter's Parachute Manual Volume I in front of me which would help for the next bit...

A "square" (ram-air) as a deployment bag or d-bag to contain the canopy. A round has a sleeve. Yes, a sleeve, a long tube of cotton or nylon or whatever they are made of to hold it in. A SL round has a d-bag but it is primarily to contain the canopy and get it into the bag. A sleeve for a freefalling round also helps to regulate the opening.

Basically with a round you pull the ripcord and that releases a spring-launched pilot chute, extracting the sleeve. You begin to decelerate somewhat at this point. Then that monstrous 24' round or 28' Lo-Po with a TU mod comes out of the sleeve and what stops it from opening instantly?

Not a damn thing.

Where's Bill L-Bach to "square" me away? I made a funny.....

CMR, I was studying for my FAA Rigger's ticket at one point so some of this has stuck with me. I know computers and parachutes, I know nothing about cars or trucks. Strength vs. weakness, knowledge vs. ignorance.

airbornelawyer
11 May 2005, 23:08
Concerning french combat jumps after WW 2 I came across this list:

French Combat Jumps 1946-1978.

Based on two books by Bragg and Turner.
...
Source (http://cervens.net/legionbbs/showthread.php?t=580)
A couple of things to note about that list:

1. Some of the dates are wrong, but mainly typos (i.e. off by one month). Also, there are several jumps missing, such as the April 16, 1949 jump into Cha Vai by the 1st Platoon, 1st Company, 1st Foreign Parachute Battalion (1er BEP), a Foreign Legion para unit.

2. This list includes both combat jumps and several admin jumps, though in a guerrilla war even admin jumps involve risks. Of course, this even is the case in conventional wars, such as the 101st Airborne's drop in Operation Market Garden in 1944 and the 173rd's drop in Iraqi Kurdistan in 2003.

3. Many of these jumps were by the same unit, although the designations have changed over the years. For example, the "DemiBrigade SAS" was formed in Great Britain in WW2 as the French contingent of the British Special Air Service. It was later renamed the 1ere Demi-Brigade coloniale de commandos parachutistes, and is on the list several more times as "1 BCCP", "DBCCP" and "DemiBrigade Colonial Paras". Today, it is the 1er RPIMa (1er Régiment Parachutiste d'Infanterie de Marine) and remains the main French special operations unit, still organized and trained on SAS lines. It served in the C-JSOTF in Afghanistan in 2003-2004, marking probably the only French ground combat contribution to the GWOT (other ground troops are in ISAF, which is more peacekeeping than combat).

4. The list ID's the major units involved, but in many cases it was not the entire unit jumping. For example, among the Foreign Legion jumps listed, 1er BEP's April 29, 1949 jump into Phu Lo Xoc only involved half the battalion. The March 24, 1949 jump by 2e BEP in Cambodia was actually only by its 1st Company. The jump listed as "21-5 Indochina 2 BEP and Para Medics" was into My Trach on May 21, 1950 and only involved the 2nd Company, providing security for the medics dropped to treat casualties.

Tow other 1950 jumps are "17-9 Indochina 1 BEP" and "8-10 Indochina 3 BCCP, 1 BEP". In the first of these, the entire battalion dropped into That Khe, where it was joined by a ground force, mainly of Moroccan troops, driving up from Lang Son. On September 30, the Legionnaires and Moroccans moved out from That Khe to hit Viet Minh forces in Dong Khe. They encountered a superior force in dug-in positions, tried to maneuver around, and in a series of maneuvers, were trapped in Coc Xa Gorge, where the Legionnaires and Moroccans were annihilated. The second jump, an attempt to reinforce the task force, involved the newly arrived Replacement Company of the 1er BEP and a two-company force from the 3e BCCP (Battalion coloniale de commandos parachutistes). They too were annihilated by superior Viet Minh forces, and the 1er BEP ceased to exist.

A new 1er BEP was formed. It was annihilated at Dien Bien Phu. A third 1er BEP was formed, where it fought with distinction in Algeria and was expanded to regiment size. The 1er REP became the fireforce for the Legion in Algeria, and played a major role in the attempted General's Putsch. It was then disbanded.

On that list, the big jumps are "20-11 Indochina 1 BPC, II/1 RCP, 1 BEP, 5 BPVN, 8 BPChoc" and "13-3 Indochina 1 BPC, II/1 RCP, 2 BEP, 6 BPC, 5 BPVN," which were the main jumps to reinforce Dien Bien Phu. All of these units were destroyed, but most were reconstituted.

Besides the French and the Americans, there haven't been a lot of combat jumps since World War Two. Besides the French listed above, the British also jumped in the Suez in 1956. Elements of 16 Para Brigade, mainly 3 Para, landed on Gamil Airfield, Port Said, Egypt, on 5 Nov 1956. More here: http://www.britains-smallwars.com/suez/Drop.html

Doogie320
11 May 2005, 23:16
Because some of you are just dying to see what I’m talking about. Early skydiving information… remember that this stuff was a “proving ground” of sorts for the early HALO attempts in SEA. There wasn’t a HALO program and skydiving gave birth to HALO/ MFF. I’ve run into numerous older SF types through skydiving. Essentially the older guys took a civilian product and adapted it for a military purpose.

Balls, big ones. Pioneers are rarely the faint of heart.

http://www.olywa.net/yosemiteflash/SDTGODS.htm

http://www.batnet.com/mfwright/jumpround.html

http://60sjumper.skydiveworld.com/littleton.htm

http://60sjumper.skydiveworld.com/altus.htm

Dave76
12 May 2005, 10:22
@airbornelawyer:

Awesome info, thanks! You know your turf!

Just some additions to your comments:

Tow other 1950 jumps are "17-9 Indochina 1 BEP" and "8-10 Indochina 3 BCCP, 1 BEP". In the first of these, the entire battalion dropped into That Khe, where it was joined by a ground force, mainly of Moroccan troops, driving up from Lang Son. On September 30, the Legionnaires and Moroccans moved out from That Khe to hit Viet Minh forces in Dong Khe. They encountered a superior force in dug-in positions, tried to maneuver around, and in a series of maneuvers, were trapped in Coc Xa Gorge, where the Legionnaires and Moroccans were annihilated. The second jump, an attempt to reinforce the task force, involved the newly arrived Replacement Company of the 1er BEP and a two-company force from the 3e BCCP (Battalion coloniale de commandos parachutistes). They too were annihilated by superior Viet Minh forces, and the 1er BEP ceased to exist.

AFAIK the Task Force tried twice to break through to Dong Khe (9-30 & 10-2) before becoming trapped in Coc Xa Gorge. In that one week long fight for survival only 23 Legionnaires were able to reach friendly lines.

On that list, the big jumps are "20-11 Indochina 1 BPC, II/1 RCP, 1 BEP, 5 BPVN, 8 BPChoc" and "13-3 Indochina 1 BPC, II/1 RCP, 2 BEP, 6 BPC, 5 BPVN," which were the main jumps to reinforce Dien Bien Phu. All of these units were destroyed, but most were reconstituted.

Concerning "big jumps", what about the jump of 1er BEP, 2° BEP, 3° BPC on 11-9-1950 into Phu Doan (Operation Marion, part of OP Lorraine)which involved 2350 trooper? (it's also NOT on the list I posted)

Concerning DBP jumps, the "20-11 Indochina 1BPC, II/1 RCP, 1 BEP, 5 BPVN, 8 BPChoc" was AFAIK really two jumps (Operation Castor) the first on 11-20 by 6° BPC (Bigeard), DZ "Natascha"; 2°/1er RCP (Brechignac), DZ "Simone"; 1er BPC (Souquet) & PC EDAP (Forcade). The second on 11-21 by 1er BEP (Guiraud), 8° BPC (Tourret), 1er CEPML (Moliner). These jumps were actually not reinforcement jumps but the first CEFEO troops arriving at Dien Bien Phu.

The reinforcement jumps you are referring to were during the actuall Battle/Siege of DBP in 1954 and AFAIK there were:

14.3.: 5° BPVN
16.3.: 6° BPC
22.3.: 35° RALP
2.4.: 2°/1° RCP
9.4.-11.4.: 2° BEP
20.4.: jump of ~100 volunteers (no paras)
2.5.-5.5.: 1er BPC (388 men)
note: 14.3 means 14th of march!

Please correct me if you have other info!

Besides the French and the Americans, there haven't been a lot of combat jumps since World War Two.

Other combat jumps that I know about:

12-19-1948 320 men of the Dutch Paragevechtsgroep,Maguwo-airport, near Yogyakarta, Java Indonesia
29-12-1948 ~300 men of the Dutch Paragevechtsgroep, Djambi-oilfields, Sumatra, Indonesia
01-05-1949 ~300 men of the Dutch Paragevechtsgroep, Rengat & Ajer Molek oilfields, Sumatra Indonesia
03-10-1949 ? Dutch Paragevechtsgroep, Gading, southeast of Yogyakarta, Java, Indonesia
11-24-1964 340 Belgian Paracommandos, Stanleyville Congo (Operation Dragon Rouge / Operation Red Dragon)
12-10-1971 2nd Para Battalion, 50th Parachute Brigade, Tangail, Eastpakistan (today Bangladesh)
07-20-1974 Turkish Para Commando Brigades, Cyprus
11-23-1977 Rhodesian Special Air Service, Chimoio, Mozambique, "Operation Dingo"
05-04-1978 44 Para Br SADF, Cassinga, Angola (Operation "Reindeer")
05-16-1978 2nd Company (-) of the 311th Airborne Battalion, Forces Arme'ees Zairois ( FAZ), Kolzewi, Zaire (today DR Congo)
04-18-2000 ? Russian Paratroopers, Shatoi-Province, Chechnya
??-??-2003 ?Indonesian Paratroopers, Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia

You know of anymore?

LRS Guy
12 May 2005, 11:35
Well the Rhodesians did a ungodly amount of "section, platoon and company" sized Airborne ops as part of their "FireForce" tactics. I may be wrong but in addition to D Sqdn. SAS & Selous Scouts, the entire RLI (Rhodesian Light Infantry) Regiment and the KAR (Kings African Rifles-a predominently black unit) were jump qualified.

Due to lack of helos, they used their Dakotas (C-47/DC-3) to transport their sticks of jumpers and would drop them as a blocking element. Ground elements would then drive them into the ambushing paratroopers. It was not unusual for the Fireforce to make 2-3 drops a day.

My memory is getting fuzzy, but thats a thumbnail sketch of it.

airbornelawyer
12 May 2005, 13:39
Well the Rhodesians did a ungodly amount of "section, platoon and company" sized Airborne ops as part of their "FireForce" tactics. I may be wrong but in addition to D Sqdn. SAS & Selous Scouts, the entire RLI (Rhodesian Light Infantry) Regiment and the KAR (Kings African Rifles-a predominently black unit) were jump qualified.

Due to lack of helos, they used their Dakotas (C-47/DC-3) to transport their sticks of jumpers and would drop them as a blocking element. Ground elements would then drive them into the ambushing paratroopers. It was not unusual for the Fireforce to make 2-3 drops a day.

My memory is getting fuzzy, but thats a thumbnail sketch of it.When I was in high school, I remember reading a Soldier of Fortune article on a jump from helos by a Fire Force. I'm hazy on the details, but I recall it described as a "LALO" jump (they jumped too low, from about 400 feet, which from a helicopter means even less time for the chute to deploy than from a moving aircraft, and suffered a lot of injuries).

The KAR was a British regiment. Its 1st and 2nd Battalions were disbanded when the Federation of Nyasaland and Rhodesia was abolished. The units in what became Malawi are now The Malawi Rifles. The units in what became Rhodesia were disbanded and integrated into other units.

The RAR (Rhodesian African Rifles) was the predominantly black unit you're thinking of. It was formed during WW2 from elements of the BSAP (British South African Police), a paramilitary police force. It later assumed the traditions of another colonial unit, The Rhodesia Native Regiment. The Rhodesia Native Regiment had fought in East Africa against the Germans in WW1. The RAR would fight the Japanese in Burma. By 1979, the RAR had three battalions and 6 independent companies.

An article (part 1 (http://home.tiscali.nl/rhodesia/firefor1.htm) & part 2 (http://home.tiscali.nl/rhodesia/firefor2.htm)) on Fire Force operations states that "[b]y 1977 all regular infantry were trained paratroops...," but I'm not so sure about that statement. Besides the RAR (5 bn equivalents), RLI (1 bn), SAS (1 sqn), Grey's Scouts and Selous Scouts, the Rhodesian Corps of Infantry also consisted of The Rhodesia Regiment (8 bns) and The Rhodesian Defence Regiment (2 bns). That is a lot of infantry to go through jump school. I had a friend in the Rhodesian SAS who had been initially drafted into The Rhodesia Regiment - I seem to recall him mentioning going through jump school after SAS selection, but my memory is getting fuzzy, too.

airbornelawyer
12 May 2005, 14:33
Other combat jumps that I know about:

12-19-1948 320 men of the Dutch Paragevechtsgroep,Maguwo-airport, near Yogyakarta, Java Indonesia
29-12-1948 ~300 men of the Dutch Paragevechtsgroep, Djambi-oilfields, Sumatra, Indonesia
01-05-1949 ~300 men of the Dutch Paragevechtsgroep, Rengat & Ajer Molek oilfields, Sumatra Indonesia
03-10-1949 ? Dutch Paragevechtsgroep, Gading, southeast of Yogyakarta, Java, Indonesia
11-24-1964 340 Belgian Paracommandos, Stanleyville Congo (Operation Dragon Rouge / Operation Red Dragon)
12-10-1971 2nd Para Battalion, 50th Parachute Brigade, Tangail, Eastpakistan (today Bangladesh)
07-20-1974 Turkish Para Commando Brigades, Cyprus
11-23-1977 Rhodesian Special Air Service, Chimoio, Mozambique, "Operation Dingo"
05-04-1978 44 Para Br SADF, Cassinga, Angola (Operation "Reindeer")
05-16-1978 2nd Company (-) of the 311th Airborne Battalion, Forces Arme'ees Zairois ( FAZ), Kolzewi, Zaire (today DR Congo)
04-18-2000 ? Russian Paratroopers, Shatoi-Province, Chechnya
??-??-2003 ?Indonesian Paratroopers, Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia

You know of anymore?To clarify, the jump into Tangail was by the 2nd Para Battalion of the Indian Army.

August 11, 1961: Operação Quipedro, into Quipedro, Portuguese Angola. Batalhão de Caçadores Pára-quedistas. This is listed as their only unit combat jump, but the Portuguese paras, os Boinas Verdes (the Green Berets), might have made other smaller jumps as they were employed similarly to the Rhodesian Fire Force and French commandos and paras in Algeria.

tony762
12 May 2005, 19:03
When I was in high school, I remember reading a Soldier of Fortune article on a jump from helos by a Fire Force. I'm hazy on the details, but I recall it described as a "LALO" jump (they jumped too low, from about 400 feet, which from a helicopter means even less time for the chute to deploy than from a moving aircraft, and suffered a lot of injuries).

The KAR was a British regiment. Its 1st and 2nd Battalions were disbanded when the Federation of Nyasaland and Rhodesia was abolished. The units in what became Malawi are now The Malawi Rifles. The units in what became Rhodesia were disbanded and integrated into other units.

The RAR (Rhodesian African Rifles) was the predominantly black unit you're thinking of. It was formed during WW2 from elements of the BSAP (British South African Police), a paramilitary police force. It later assumed the traditions of another colonial unit, The Rhodesia Native Regiment. The Rhodesia Native Regiment had fought in East Africa against the Germans in WW1. The RAR would fight the Japanese in Burma. By 1979, the RAR had three battalions and 6 independent companies.

An article (part 1 (http://home.tiscali.nl/rhodesia/firefor1.htm) & part 2 (http://home.tiscali.nl/rhodesia/firefor2.htm)) on Fire Force operations states that "[b]y 1977 all regular infantry were trained paratroops...," but I'm not so sure about that statement. Besides the RAR (5 bn equivalents), RLI (1 bn), SAS (1 sqn), Grey's Scouts and Selous Scouts, the Rhodesian Corps of Infantry also consisted of The Rhodesia Regiment (8 bns) and The Rhodesian Defence Regiment (2 bns). That is a lot of infantry to go through jump school. I had a friend in the Rhodesian SAS who had been initially drafted into The Rhodesia Regiment - I seem to recall him mentioning going through jump school after SAS selection, but my memory is getting fuzzy, too.

alot of the inf units on the line were reserve forces who were called up for service for X number of months per year, that kind of thing (after serveing their time in the regular army as consripts), the statement "all regular infantry were trained paratroops" is probably not too far wrong by 1977.
the rhodies were constantly expanding the whole fire force concept, the RAR were part of fire force by the end of the war as well as the RLI, so they were certainly para trained (first para trained blacks in africa).

BTW the Rhodesian SAS was 'C' Squadron

airbornelawyer
12 May 2005, 21:14
It's a tiny Windows Media file, but here is a 2 minute file of newsreel produced by the Service Cinématographique des Armées in 1957 which includes footage of the Suez jump:

http://www.ecpad.fr/ecpa/PagesDyn/notvdo.asp?id=501&page=1&dossierid=40&photo=0&Npage=1&collectionid=11

airbornelawyer
12 May 2005, 21:21
About two minutes into this one is footage of a mass tac in French Indochina, around 1950-51.

http://www.ecpad.fr/ecpa/PagesDyn/notvdo.asp?id=508&page=1&dossierid=39&photo=0&Npage=1&collectionid=11

The rest of the reel is combat footage from the battles in that period. Besides the fact that you don't see a lot of footage from that conflict, it's somewhat interesting to compare the footage here to that of the Korean War, taking place at the same time, and Vietnam War, same place but several years later.

tony762
13 May 2005, 01:16
]The rest of the reel is combat footage from the battles in that period.


interesting clips, thanks.
at the 1:50 mark of then second clip there is what looks to me to be footage of fallschrimjager jumping from a JU-52.

LRS Guy
13 May 2005, 01:47
This is good thread!

Thanks for correcting my Alzehimers, you guys are right I was thinking of the RAR not KAR. And it was 'C Squadron not 'D. Type-82 don't tell Paddy I screwed that up or I will never hear the end of it.

It was in June 78 'C Squadron became 1 (Rhodesian) SAS Regiment. There is a very good website www.csqn.co.za dedicated to the Rhodesian SAS

airbornelawyer
13 May 2005, 14:12
interesting clips, thanks.
at the 1:50 mark of then second clip there is what looks to me to be footage of fallschrimjager jumping from a JU-52.
Not Fallschirmjäger and not a Ju-52. It is an Amiot AAC-1 "Toucan", the French version of the Ju-52. France, like several other countries (such as Spain and Portugal), used the Ju-52 for several years after the war. These included German-made ones and the Toucans made after the war.

Here is a thread on French Ju-52s and other foreign aircraft in French service such as the Corsair and the Ju-88 (along with a bunch of pictures): http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=46312

airbornelawyer
13 May 2005, 14:17
Starting about 1952, French Ju-52s/AAC-1s and C-47s were replaced by the Nord 2501 Noratlas, a twin-boomed transport similar in appearance to the C-119 "Flying Boxcar". You can see it in the Suez jump clip. Here is a picture of Israeli paratroopers jumping from one.

airbornelawyer
13 May 2005, 14:21
And for comparison, C-119s dropping jumpers:

airbornelawyer
13 May 2005, 14:55
Other combat jumps:

Besides the Franco-British jump in the Suez Crisis, there were also several Israeli jumps.

On October 29, 1956, Operation Kadesh opened with the 890th Paratrooper Battalion making a combat jump to secure the Mitla Pass. The 395-man battalion was commanded by Lt. Col. Rafael Eitan, later Chief of Staff of the IDF. The rest of the 202nd Parachute Brigade, moving on the ground and reinforced with mech units, linked up with Eitan's battalion the following evening. The brigade was under the command of Col. Ariel Sharon, the current Prime Minister of Israel.

They took the pass in heavy fighting on October 31, after a reconnaissance-in-force under Maj. Mordechai Gur (commanding the 88th Nahal Paratrooper Battalion) ran into stiff Egyptian resistance. As a colonel, Gur would lead the paratroopers in the capture of the Old City of Jerusalem in the Six-Day War. He too was later later Chief of Staff of the IDF.

On November 2, two companies dropped on al-Tur, on the southeastern shore of the Gulf of Suez 100km from Sharm al-Sheikh. More troops moving on the ground linked up with them on November 4, and the Parachute Brigade and the 9th Infantry Brigade then captured Sharm al-Sheikh in a pincer movement.

In subsequent conflicts, Israeli paratroopers have been used primarily as heliborne infantry or mechanized infantry.

tony762
13 May 2005, 18:07
Not Fallschirmjäger and not a Ju-52. It is an Amiot AAC-1 "Toucan", the French version of the Ju-52. France, like several other countries (such as Spain and Portugal), used the Ju-52 for several years after the war. These included German-made ones and the Toucans made after the war.

Here is a thread on French Ju-52s and other foreign aircraft in French service such as the Corsair and the Ju-88 (along with a bunch of pictures): http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=46312


thats really interesting, i had no idea the french used these aircraft.

i actually saw a JU-52 flying in South Africa a few years back, very cool.
though there is nothing better to bring on goose bumps like seeing and more importantly hearing a spitfire roaring overhead! :cool:

Dave76
15 May 2005, 19:47
11-5-1956: 3rd Battalion, Parachute Regiment of the British 16th Independent Parachute Brigade Group ("Red Devils") jumps into Gamil airfield during Operation "Musketeer". They jumped from Handley Page Hastings and Vickers Valettas.

@airbornelawyer:

The french jump into Port Fuad on the same day was by the 2°RPC (487 men) and by the 11° DBPChoc (100 men). The legionnaires of the 1er REP made an amphibious landing but what about 1er RCP and 21 RIC, did they jump or did they also land in landing crafts (helicopter landing?!).

airbornelawyer
16 May 2005, 18:15
11-5-1956: 3rd Battalion, Parachute Regiment of the British 16th Independent Parachute Brigade Group ("Red Devils") jumps into Gamil airfield during Operation "Musketeer". They jumped from Handley Page Hastings and Vickers Valettas.

@airbornelawyer:

The french jump into Port Fuad on the same day was by the 2°RPC (487 men) and by the 11° DBPChoc (100 men). The legionnaires of the 1er REP made an amphibious landing but what about 1er RCP and 21 RIC, did they jump or did they also land in landing crafts (helicopter landing?!). AFAIK, there were three drops: 3 Para on Gamil and two by the 2e RPC (2e Régiment de parachutistes coloniaux), reinforced by the commandos from the 11e Demi-Brigade Parachutiste de Choc. The operation was originally planned as a simultaneous airborne and amphibious attack, but circumstances forced the Anglo-French command to move the airborne portion ahead a day.

On November 5 at 7:15 a.m., about 600 British paratroopers dropped on Gamil airfield, three miles west of Port Said, after the airfield had been strafed by Hawker Hunters from 34 Sqn RAF. The airfield was defended by an Egyptian National Guard Battalion, recently reinforced by a company of the 4th Infantry Battalion, and supported by MRLs and two SU-100 SP guns deployed near the shanty town west of Port Said. Despite the fact that the Brits jumped with their weapons in separate containers (as in Market Garden, familiar to those who've read A Bridge Too Far) right on top of a numerically superior force, they quickly seized the airfield. 3 Para's A Company captured the airfield's control tower and adjoining buildings and the destroyed bridge on the west side of the airfield. B Company landed on the east and south sides of the airfield in the middle of the Egyptian defensive positions, and was reinforce by C Company, 3 Para's reserve. Unfortunately, the runway was too short for British transport planes, so reinforcements and resupply had to be dropped in. 100 more paras were dropped later that day.

Meanwhile, at 7:30 a.m., 488 French paratroopers from 2e RPC and 11e DBPC were dropped southeast of Port-Said from about 150 meters into a sandy drop zone between the Suez Canal and the adjoining sweetwater channel. The DZ was narrow, measuring about 100m x 400m, and was just south of two bridges spanning the Raswa Channel. Like US paras, but unlike their British compatriots, the French jumped with their personal weapons and immediately engaged the Egyptian defenders, in some cases before they'd even landed.

The French objective was to secure the bridges to prevent the Egyptians from reinforcing Port Said. The French destroyed the Egyptian forces on the DZ and the nearby water works and moved to the bridges. The Egyptians destroyed the smaller pontoon bridge at about 8:30, but the main road-and-railway bridge was taken by 9:00 a.m. The French mission was to hold the main bridge until British ground reinforcements were to arrive from the port, which would prevent Egyptian reinforcements from being deployed to oppose the amphibious landings and then allow Anglo-British forces to advance southward to secure the Suez Canal's southern end.

The second French drop was in the afternoon, on the east side of the Suez Canal, with the objective of securing Port Fouad. At 13:15, 522 paratroopers from 2e RPC dropped on a golf course south of Port-Fouad between the town and the salt pans to the east. They quickly defeated the remaining Egyptian forces in the area (already mauled by airstrikes) and took the port. I believe A Troop, Guards Independent Parachute Company, was attached to this French force for liaison purposes, but they might have been in the other drop.

The main opposition to the French on both sides of the canal had come from two companies of the 4th Infantry Battalion and two of the 275th Infantry Battalion, supported by two SU-100s. There were also some customs police, coast guardsmen and national guardsmen in the port.

Most of the day's objectives had been secured. The British controlled the airfield and the western approaches to Port Said, but had not moved into the port itself. The French had secured the southern approaches to the port and taken Port Fuad on the eastern side of the canal.

Awaiting resupply, 3 Para spent the afternoon and evening of November 5 engaging the Egyptians outside the sewage farm between Gamil airfield and Port Said. There was bitter fighting near the Sewage Gardens and the Muslim Cemetery west of Port Said, where they faced a battalion-sized force from the 291st Infantry Battalion and remnants of the company of the 4th Infantry Battalion and the National Guard Battalion from the airfield. The paras moved out toward the city proper the next morning.

But by then the Egyptian commander in Port Said had more to worry about than paratroopers. The amphibious landings on November 6 began at dawn. The initial landing was made on either side of Port Said's casino pier by No. 40 Commando and No. 42 Commando, Royal Marines, reinforced by C Squadron, 6th Royal Tank Regiment (6 RTR).

At Port Fuad, 1er Régiment Étranger Parachutiste (1er REP) led the French amphibious landing, accompanied by a squadron of AMX-13 tanks. I have been unable to figure out whose tanks they were. The French ground forces that were to reinforce the paratroopers of the 10e Division Parachutiste came from the 7e Division Méchanique Rapide, but that division's tank unit, the 2e Régiment de Dragons, did not deploy from Algeria to the Suez. The tanks might have been attached to 1er REP from one of the Legion's cavalry regiments. Seaborne reinforcements for the 1er REP task force came from the 1er Régiment de Chasseurs Parachutistes (1er RCP), the 21e Régiment d'Infanterie Coloniale (21e RIC) and another regiment whose identity I haven't confirmed (probably the 3e Régiment de parachutistes coloniaux, 3e RPC). None of 1er RCP, 21e RIMa, the 21e RIC's successor, or 3e RPIMa, successor to the 3e RPC carry a battle honor for Suez on their regimental flag, so I assume they were not credited with a major combat role.

The helicopter-borne air assault was made by No. 45 Commando, Royal Marines. About one hour after the other Marines landed, the commando's commanding officer reconnoitered the downtown sports stadium as an LZ. On the return trip, he received heavy Egyptian fire and changed the LZ to the canal's western breakwater, east of the debarkation points by the casino pier. The helicopters departed the HMS Theseus and HMS Ocean shortly after 8 a.m. It took just under an hour and a half to land the commando's 415 Royal Marines and their equipment, as each of the 22 helicopters involved could only carry 3-5 Royal Marines.

So by morning, the British had the bulk of 3rd Commando Brigade ashore. By early afternoon, 1 Para and 2 Para had been debarked in the port, along with A Sqn, 6 RTR, and the rest of the Guards Independent Parachute Company, so the bulk of 16th Parachute Brigade was also on shore. By evening, 3 Para linked up with No. 45 Commando. The Egyptians attempted to retake the water works and the Raswa Channel bridge, but the attack, by a scraped together battalion supported by SU-100s, was shattered by the French paras and close air support. Soon afterward, No. 42 Commando and A Sqn, 6 RTR linked up with the French paras at the bridge.

That evening, the Anglo-French forces received orders to halt operations by midnight, but the actual halt took place at about 2 a.m.

There are a number of sources - French, British and Egyptian - on various aspects of this operation, but I note that many are tinly sourced and many have conflicting information.

Here is a link to a series of photos of the 2e RCP in the Suez, from the same source as the video above: http://www.ecpad.fr/ecpa/PagesDyn/result.asp?dossierID=21&photo=1&collectionid=6

Here is a map of Port Said and Port Fuad, showing most of the LZ/DZs and key objectives:

Dave76
17 May 2005, 12:25
Thanks for the accurate reply!

The second French drop was in the afternoon, on the east side of the Suez Canal, with the objective of securing Port Fouad. At 13:15, 522 paratroopers from 2e RPC dropped on a golf course south of Port-Fouad between the town and the salt pans to the east. They quickly defeated the remaining Egyptian forces in the area (already mauled by airstrikes) and took the port. I believe A Troop, Guards Independent Parachute Company, was attached to this French force for liaison purposes, but they might have been in the other drop.

One source states the 9th Independent Squadron Royal Engineers as the attached british unit another says "combat engineers of the Guards Ind. Parachute Company". But I think this is a trustworthy entry concerning the attached british unit:
Guards Independent Parachute Company, Guards Company (Pathfinders)was part of the 16th Indep Para Bde. Major Kemis Buckley O/C, A detachment was dropped with the French for liaison. Captain Murray DeKlee in charge. The balance came in on an LST and made it down to El Cap before the cease fire
And 9th Independent Parachute Squadron Royal Engineers 1 troop was attached to 1 Para, 2 troop with 2 Para, 3 troop with 3 Para explaines where the Engineers were.


And one other thing that I don't quite get:
Who was part of the 10e Division Parachutiste? Was it 2° RPC, 11° DBPChoc and 1er RPC?


Concerning the 2nd israeli drop on Al-Tur on 2nd november '56 I found that:
[...]a decision was taken the C-47/Dakotas of the 103 Sqn to fly two companies of paras to A-Tur, a small town south of Port Said. 175 paras were dropped over the place around 17:00hrs, which by the evening have cleared a small landing strip, where additional transports could bring reinforcements, supplies, and even some vehicles, which made it possible to mount a second prong of the offensive towards Sharm al-Sheikh.

but to which unit did the two companies belong? 202nd Parachute Brigade? If so which battalion? And was there any egyptian opposition?

airbornelawyer
17 May 2005, 15:33
And one other thing that I don't quite get:
Who was part of the 10e Division Parachutiste? Was it 2° RPC, 11° DBPChoc and 1er RPC?French divisions, especially in Algeria, did not have fixed structures. Regiments moved from division to division over the years, and were often cross attached for various missions. It is not entirely clear, but in late 1956 I believe the main components of 10e DP were:

1er Régiment Étranger de Parachutistes (1er REP)
1er Régiment de Chasseurs Parachutistes (1er RCP)
1er Régiment de Parachutistes Coloniaux (1er RPC)
2e Régiment de Parachutistes Coloniaux (2e RPC)
3e Régiment de Parachutistes Coloniaux (3e RPC)
20e Groupe d’Artillerie Parachutiste (20e GAP)
13e Régiment de Dragons Parachutistes (13e RDP)

and also possibly the 6e Régiment de Parachutistes Coloniaux (6e RPC). 11e Demi-Brigade was a separate task force HQ.

but to which unit did the two companies belong? 202nd Parachute Brigade? If so which battalion? And was there any egyptian opposition?At the time, all the paratroopers belonged to the 202nd Brigade (Unit 202). The at-Tur jump was by Mordechai Gur's 88th Nahal Paratrooper Battalion. I don't know about opposition - not in the immediate DZ, but they were certainly dropping well behind enemy lines.

Dave76
18 May 2005, 07:30
And again thanks for the answer al!

I just found info on british SAS(Malayan Scouts) jumps in the "Malaya Emergency".
There must have been several but I only can confirm these:

February 1952: Operation 'Helsby', B Squadron SAS (54 men) jump into Belum Valley to act as a blocking force; A and C Squadron + detachments from the Royal Marine Commandos + local police arrive by foot.

January 1954: Operation 'Sword', ? SAS, 3 dead troopers

July 1954: Operation 'Termite', A, B and C Squadron SAS jump into Perak

February 1958: Operation 'Sweep': D Squadron SAS (37 men) jumps into Telok Anson Swamps


The Malayan Scouts (22 SAS) were formed 1950/51 on the scene in Malaya. Until 1955 there were 3 squadrons:
A Squadron, volunteers from the Far East
B Squadron, wartime reservists who had been formed to fight in Korea
C Squadron, volunteers from Rhodesia

"In the summer of 1955, a squadron of SAS was raised in New Zealand and after rigorous selection and basic training arrived in Malaya towards the end of the year, where they carried out their parachute course. The total strength of the squadron was 140, a third of whom were Maoris who found it easy to work with the aborigine tribesmen. Major Frank Rennie commanded the squadron. After a brief shakedown period they went on to make a valuable contribution to the strength. Another squadron was added to the strength at the end of 1955, formed from volunteers from the Parachute Regiment where it was known as the Parachute Regiment Squadron and commanded by Major Dudley Coventry. These additions brought the strength of 22 SAS to 560 all ranks, divided into five squadrons each with four troops of sixteen men, plus headquarters personnel and attached specialists."

All info and the last paragraph is from britains-smallwars.com (http://www.britains-smallwars.com/SAS/Malaya.html)

USN Intel Guy
2 June 2005, 21:34
For more on the Rhodesian Light Infantry (and a shitload of combat jumps), check out Chris Cock's book entitled "Fireforce". It takes a little work, but it can be found. Unfortunately, I have yet to find any sort of comprehensive unit history book on the RLI, so we're relegated to his book. There are a couple of comprehensive books available on the history of C Squadron, 22nd SAS (Rhodesian) and the Selous Scouts, but neither group conducted combat jumps anywhere near the scale of the RLI (I don't believe the Selous Scouts conducted any even though a good portion of their members were jump qualified).

Ranger Manges
3 June 2005, 13:52
I'm currently researching combat jumps in the time after the end of WW2 to the present.

I know about a combat jump of the 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry, 173rd Airborne Brigade during "Operation Junction City" in Vietnam.

Was this the only combat jump in that conflict?

If I remember correctly, I'll have to check, 101st Pathfinders made 5 jumps

Ranger Manges
3 June 2005, 13:57
There was a book by Shelby Stanton on the 1st Cav Divison's ops in VN. In the appendix it mentioned the Cav's Pathfinder Det. did several parachute ops in support of air assults though I have never seen it confirmed anywhere else.

Yep, those are the one's.......I have the documentation, just have to find it

tony762
6 June 2005, 19:38
For more on the Rhodesian Light Infantry (and a shitload of combat jumps), check out Chris Cock's book entitled "Fireforce". It takes a little work, but it can be found. Unfortunately, I have yet to find any sort of comprehensive unit history book on the RLI, so we're relegated to his book. There are a couple of comprehensive books available on the history of C Squadron, 22nd SAS (Rhodesian) and the Selous Scouts, but neither group conducted combat jumps anywhere near the scale of the RLI (I don't believe the Selous Scouts conducted any even though a good portion of their members were jump qualified).


"The incredibles: The story of the 1st Battalion, the Rhodesian Light Infantry"
by Geoffrey Bond


its out of print but can still be purchased if you look.

FYI, I will tell all to beware of anything written by peter stiff about rhodesia and south africa

Dave76
15 August 2005, 17:04
Okay, another question concerning post WW2 combat jumps:

there were several jumps by Indonesian paratroopers (what unit, if regular troops were involved? insurgents?)into Malaysia in the so called "Indonesian Confrontation" in the year 1964. The only info I could find is:

On August 17, Indonesian paratroopers landed on the southwest coast of Johore and attempted to establish guerilla groups. On September 2, more paratroopers landed in Labis, Johore. On October 29, 52 soldiers landed in Pontian on the Johore-Malacca border and were captured by New Zealand Army personnel.

President Soekarno objected to the formation of Malaysia where on the 17/18 August and 2nd of September 1964 Indonesian insurgents landed and parachuted into Labis and South Johore at Ayer Panas embarking on an undeclared war known as 'Confrontation'.The Battalion [1st Battalion, Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment I guess] was moved to Majidi barracks in Johore under the command of the 4th Malaysian Brigade. In support of the 10th Gurka Rifles (Princess Mary¹s Own), the Battalion started operations against the paratroopers in the Labis and Ayer Panas areas. At this time RNZIR was responsible for the capture of 3 Paratroopers and driving others out into the Malaysian Army and Police Field Forces arms. At the end of the operation the entire 96 strong Indonesian group had either been killed or captured. Included in the capture was Lt Soetikno the leader of the Group.


On 1 September, ninety-eight Indonesian paratroopers landed just north of Labis in Johore. One of the few available Commonwealth units in the area was 1st Battalion, RNZIR, which, with Wellington's permission, was used to hunt down the infiltrators, most of whom surrendered without a struggle.


Does anybody have more intel on that? I'm especially interested in what kind of troops the Indonesians used, my understanding is that they tried to establish some sort of guerilla movement. If so, did they employ specially trained units?

airbornelawyer
15 August 2005, 17:46
Below is an excerpt from the diary of Roy "Doc" Savage, who was with 3rd Royal Australian Regiment in Malaya in the timeframe. It recounts the same events, with some additional or corroborating details.
On the 2nd of September, just before we went up to the border, Indonesian Airborne troops parachuted into Labis in south central Malaya. These troops were commanded by Lieutenant Sutikno. They were expecting the Malay civilians to help them, however the civilians dobbed them in and all were captured.

In early November 1964, fifty-two Indonesians landed by sea in the Merlimau swamps just South of Malacca. My Company was sent down to deal with them, we threw a cordon round them, 10 platoon behind a rice paddy bund leading to the sea, 11 platoon behind paddy bunds facing the sea and 12 platoon (my platoon) facing 11 platoon in the swamp itself. I was the forward scout closest to the sea. We got into position just before last light. During the Thursday night the enemy fought all night as they tried to Mortar and Machinegun their way through the cordon. Ronny Carroll (who was to die in Vietnam) got a round through his Rifle magazine.

During the night the tide came in and we had to hold onto Mangroves for just over two hours, as we couldn't touch the bottom. When the tide went out we were again chest deep in mud. I don't know whether I was more scared that night from the enemy or the chance of a crocodile appearing. There were also fish that skipped across the mud and climbed trees, hard to believe I know, but true!

During the night they moved up our Mortar platoon as well as the Australian Artillery. We were also backed up by the Saladin Armoured Cars of the fourth Royal Tank Regiment, as well as in reserve a Company of New Zealanders and a Company of Gurkha Riflemen. Just before first light our Mortar platoon (using 3 inch Mortars) set down a barrage which forced the enemy to try and break out through our platoon. Just after first light we asked for a resupply of ammunition which was brought up by the Military Police. When we broke open the boxes we found that they had sent in 7.62 Blank Ammo we were not impressed I was right as I had a 9mm Owen sub machine gun. It took another hour plus to rectify the mistake. At 11am we started our assault towards 10 platoon. We had approximately eight hundred yards to go and many a nasty words passed our way as they tried to speed things up. However if I stood up I was in chest deep mud, all I could do was to lie on top of the mud and pull myself along. We reached 10 platoon just after 4pm. It had taken us five hours to go that distance.

The military authorities expressed surprise at the Indonesians choice of a landing spot, which put them well within striking distance of the 28th Commonwealth Brigade. The prisoners were handed over to other Australians who delivered them to the Sungie Rambai Police Station.
http://docsdiaries.tripod.com/6365.htm

tony762
16 August 2005, 15:26
Okay, another question concerning post WW2 combat jumps:

there were several jumps by Indonesian paratroopers (what unit, if regular troops were involved? insurgents?)into Malaysia in the so called "Indonesian Confrontation" in the year 1964. The only info I could find is:


Does anybody have more intel on that? I'm especially interested in what kind of troops the Indonesians used, my understanding is that they tried to establish some sort of guerilla movement. If so, did they employ specially trained units?




Indonesia began to sponsor sporadic attacks against targets in Sarawak by Indonesian "volunteers" posing as homegrown rebel groups. Nevertheless, the formation of the Federation of Malaysia went forward and was formally proclaimed on September 16, 1963, Brunei having earlier withdrawn from the scheme.

Very rapidly, the Malaysian Confrontation involved Britain, the United States, the Soviet Union, and the People's Republic of China. In desperation, Indonesia abandoned any pretext that local rebel units were responsible for the attacks in northern Borneo, and in early March of 1964, regular Indonesian forces entered the fighting.

tony762
18 August 2005, 00:12
Indonesia's opposition to the 1963 establishment of the Federation of Malaysia presented the only known external threat to Singapore since Japanese occupation. The opposition of Indonesian President Sukarno to the incorporation of Sabah and Sarawak on the island of Borneo into the Federation of Malaysia set up the early stages of a low-intensity conflict called Confrontation, which lasted three years and contributed to Sukarno's political demise. In August 1963, Indonesia deployed several thousand army units to the Indonesian-Malaysian border on Borneo. Throughout the latter part of 1963 and all of 1964 the Indonesian army dispatched units, usually comprising no more than 100 troops, to conduct acts of sabotage and to incite disaffected groups to participate in an insurrection that Djakarta hoped would lead to the dissolution of the Federation. In June and July 1964, Indonesian army units infiltrated Singapore with instructions to destroy transportation and other links between the island and the state of Johor on the Malay Peninsula. Indonesia's Kalimantan Army Command also may have been involved in the September 1964 communal riots in Singapore. These riots occurred at the same time Indonesian army units were deployed to areas in Johor in an attempt to locate and encourage inactive communists in the Chinese communities to reestablish guerrilla bases destroyed by British and Malaysian military units during the Emergency. After September 1964, Indonesia discontinued military operations targeting Singapore. In March 1965, however, a Singapore infantry battalion deployed on the southern coast of Johor was involved in fighting against a small Indonesian force that was conducting guerrilla operations in the vicinity of Kota Tinggi. Indonesia supported Singapore's separation from Malaysia in 1965 and used diplomatic and economic incentives in an unsuccessful effort to encourage the Lee administration to sever its defense ties with Malaysia and Britain. In March 1966, General Soeharto, who until October 1965 was deputy chief of the Kalimantan Army Command, supplanted President Sukarno as Indonesia's de facto political leader. Soeharto quickly moved to end the Confrontation and to reestablish normal relations with Malaysia and Singapore.

Data as of December 1989

Dave76
6 September 2005, 11:21
Since I didn't want to open a new thread for my small question I thought to just put into here:

Concerning the SEAL Team Six/CCT jump during Operation Urgent Fury:

First Source says:

CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS: The combined SEAL/CCT team is tasked to perform a night combat equipment water jump into the ocean about 40 kilometers off the north-northwest tip of Port Salinas, Grenada. They are to use the LAPES (low Altitude Parachute Extraction System) method of exiting the aircraft into the water DZ. Dropping with two zodiac inflatable rubber boats, they are to rendezvous after the drop, and do an Over the Horizon (OTH) transit of approximately 40 kilometers to the vicinity of Port Salinas.

Whereas the second says:

CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS: The combined SEAL/CCT team is tasked to perform a night combat equipment water jump into the ocean about 40 kilometers off the north-northwest tip of Port Salinas, Grenada. They are to use a Rubber Duck insertion into the water DZ. Dropping with two Zodiac inflatable rubber boats, they are to rendezvous after the drop, and do an Over the Horizon (OTH) transit of approximately 40 kilometers to the vicinity of Port Salinas.


So my question is:
Did they do they drop via LAPES (is the LAPES even used for personnel extraction?) or did they use the Rubber Duck insertion?
And if they inserted via the Rubber Duck method, from what altitude did they jump?
Is there any info available on why the 4 SEALs drowned?

If this more appropriate in the SEALs section let me know.

Dave76
9 September 2005, 07:54
Can't anyone elaborate on the ill-fated SEAL jump in Grenada?

Any help/comments would be very much appreciated.

Thanks.

Floyd
9 September 2005, 08:15
I dont think LAPES would be used for personnel. At least I have never come across that term being applied to a personnel drop.
On the first one maybe the writer got confused and meant to say the Zodiacs were supposed to be LAPESed in but that would not make much sense either.

If anyone has access to the names of the CCT guys involved in Urgent Fury I have a name I am curious about if he was involved in the operation.

Dave76
30 September 2005, 13:28
Thanks Floyd. That's what I thought aswell.

Does anybody know more about the following jump by 22nd SAS in Oman in 1970:

Oman(Musandam Peninsula) 1970, including first operational free-fall jump by 22SAS

Got I from the specialoperations.com page:

http://www.specialoperations.com/Foreign/United_Kingdom/SAS/Sabre_Squadrons.htm

tony762
30 September 2005, 13:50
I beleive its mentioned in the book 'no mean soldier'

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0304356840/qid=1128102648/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-2409176-1590225?v=glance&s=books

BTW that link fails to mention that the NZ and OZ SAS were in vietnam! rather large oversight.

Thanks Floyd. That's what I thought aswell.

Does anybody know more about the following jump by 22nd SAS in Oman in 1970:



Got I from the specialoperations.com page:

http://www.specialoperations.com/Foreign/United_Kingdom/SAS/Sabre_Squadrons.htm

Class29wc
1 October 2005, 00:21
BTW that link fails to mention that the NZ and OZ SAS were in vietnam! rather large oversight.[/QUOTE]

Hear!!!Hear!!!
RDR
VN Vet

Dave76
1 October 2005, 12:01
Thanks tony! That book sounds very interesting. I think I'm going to buy it.

tony762
1 October 2005, 12:35
This book is better IMO.

Killing Zone: A Life in the Paras, the Recces, the SAS and the RUC.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0747525676/qid=1128184437/sr=2-3/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_3/104-5439265-2371146?v=glance&s=books

you're welcome :)

Dave76
1 October 2005, 19:51
WILCO!

So I guess I'll have to buy both.:D


And another jump question:

I read in another forum (okay, it was the controversial mp.net:rolleyes: ) that
USAF PJs did a HALO jump into Astan to rescue a wounded Aussie SF soldier in OEF
and that
the Brit's did a HALO in Afghanistan operationally

Is that true? Any intel on that?

Doogie320
2 October 2005, 18:42
The PJs DID do an MFF jump IIRC in Astan in late 2002 or 2003 to rescue a coalition soldier. There is a site, "PJsinNam", something like that, a google should find it, that link to the stories.

EDIT: Try this:
http://www.pjsinnam.com/War_on_Terror/EF/News_EF.htm

Towards the bottom:
16 February 2002 - PJs Parachute into Afghanistan
Synopsis - Three PJs freefall parachuted from an HC-130 (call sign Fever 11) into Afghanistan to provide emergency medical care to an Australian SAS trooper. The PJs were SMSgt Bill Sine, TSgt Rich Carroll and SrA Randall Wilkes. Also on board the HC-130 were PJs 2nd Lt Matt MacGinness and SSgt Jason Baird. They did not jump but helped with the command and control while the HC-130 orbited. Lt MacGinness is one of the new breed of Combat Rescue Officers. All of the PJs on the HC-130 are assigned to the 38 RQS (Pararescue Squadron) at Moody AFB. The PJ team and patient were extracted by an HH-60 Pave Hawk flown by an aircrew normally assigned to the 66th RQS, Nellis AFB. On board the HH-60 was another PJ, Pat Harding. Despite the best efforts of the PJ team, the patients multiple trauma injuries were too severe and he died while under their care. The attached news articles are from the Sydney Morning Herald. The comment about a surgeon parachuting in with the PJs is an error. This combat jump earns the PJs a gold star on the HALO jump wings. A hearty "well done" to the PJs and the rescue aircrews who inserted and extracted them. Combat rescue is alive and doing very well in Afghanistan. Several troops in contact medevacs have been flown by Air Rescue Pavehawks. These rescues, often under enemy fire are being accomplished more often than one is aware. OPSEC requirements are restricting the flow of any additional specific information.

Dave76
2 October 2005, 21:12
Thanks! That helped.


What about this jump:

Date: 15 January 1991
Unit: Special Forces, HALO Team
Operation: Desert Storm
Troopers: 12
Country: Iraq
Dropzone: Northwest desert Aircraft: MC-130E Combat Talons turboprop or C-141B Starlifter turbojet aircraft

Any details? Which unit jumped, Army SF? And what was the objective?

Doogie320
2 October 2005, 21:22
I've heard of that one before and never seen anything about it. I'd guess an SR mission along the Euphrates, but that is just a guess. I don't have any info. The particulars may still be classified or else we'd hear more about it.

EDIT: Considering we have several members here with MFF wings and an 18 series MOS and they haven't mentioned anything about it here.....

Jerman
19 May 2014, 12:34
S/L? That was the only mass jump, if you can call it a combat jump. IIRC SF had secured the DZ for that Op before the 173rd jumped in.

SF teams did some S/L inserts and there is the attached document concerning HALO jumps by MACV-SOG.

No SF were on the ground. Even the AF controller for the heavy equipment drop jumped in with the paratroopers. The DZ was unknown even to Westmoreland. AF bombed north section of the DZ when equipment drop received sniper fire. One blog site even says an engineering battalion had secured the DZ and kids were running around selling soda pop. I was RTO for Recon handling Bn Net and would have seen and heard this obvious lie.

SF_BHT
19 May 2014, 20:58
No SF were on the ground. Even the AF controller for the heavy equipment drop jumped in with the paratroopers. The DZ was unknown even to Westmoreland. AF bombed north section of the DZ when equipment drop received sniper fire. One blog site even says an engineering battalion had secured the DZ and kids were running around selling soda pop. I was RTO for Recon handling Bn Net and would have seen and heard this obvious lie.

Thanks for posting now go and follow the rules and post an intro and make sure your profile is filled in.

Guy Mullins
1 September 2014, 18:15
@airbornelawyer:

Awesome info, thanks! You know your turf!

Just some additions to your comments:



AFAIK the Task Force tried twice to break through to Dong Khe (9-30 & 10-2) before becoming trapped in Coc Xa Gorge. In that one week long fight for survival only 23 Legionnaires were able to reach friendly lines.



Concerning "big jumps", what about the jump of 1er BEP, 2° BEP, 3° BPC on 11-9-1950 into Phu Doan (Operation Marion, part of OP Lorraine)which involved 2350 trooper? (it's also NOT on the list I posted)

Concerning DBP jumps, the "20-11 Indochina 1BPC, II/1 RCP, 1 BEP, 5 BPVN, 8 BPChoc" was AFAIK really two jumps (Operation Castor) the first on 11-20 by 6° BPC (Bigeard), DZ "Natascha"; 2°/1er RCP (Brechignac), DZ "Simone"; 1er BPC (Souquet) & PC EDAP (Forcade). The second on 11-21 by 1er BEP (Guiraud), 8° BPC (Tourret), 1er CEPML (Moliner). These jumps were actually not reinforcement jumps but the first CEFEO troops arriving at Dien Bien Phu.

The reinforcement jumps you are referring to were during the actuall Battle/Siege of DBP in 1954 and AFAIK there were:

14.3.: 5° BPVN
16.3.: 6° BPC
22.3.: 35° RALP
2.4.: 2°/1° RCP
9.4.-11.4.: 2° BEP
20.4.: jump of ~100 volunteers (no paras)
2.5.-5.5.: 1er BPC (388 men)
note: 14.3 means 14th of march!

Please correct me if you have other info!



Other combat jumps that I know about:

12-19-1948 320 men of the Dutch Paragevechtsgroep,Maguwo-airport, near Yogyakarta, Java Indonesia
29-12-1948 ~300 men of the Dutch Paragevechtsgroep, Djambi-oilfields, Sumatra, Indonesia
01-05-1949 ~300 men of the Dutch Paragevechtsgroep, Rengat & Ajer Molek oilfields, Sumatra Indonesia
03-10-1949 ? Dutch Paragevechtsgroep, Gading, southeast of Yogyakarta, Java, Indonesia
11-24-1964 340 Belgian Paracommandos, Stanleyville Congo (Operation Dragon Rouge / Operation Red Dragon)
12-10-1971 2nd Para Battalion, 50th Parachute Brigade, Tangail, Eastpakistan (today Bangladesh)
07-20-1974 Turkish Para Commando Brigades, Cyprus
11-23-1977 Rhodesian Special Air Service, Chimoio, Mozambique, "Operation Dingo"
05-04-1978 44 Para Br SADF, Cassinga, Angola (Operation "Reindeer")
05-16-1978 2nd Company (-) of the 311th Airborne Battalion, Forces Arme'ees Zairois ( FAZ), Kolzewi, Zaire (today DR Congo)
04-18-2000 ? Russian Paratroopers, Shatoi-Province, Chechnya
??-??-2003 ?Indonesian Paratroopers, Aceh, Sumatra, Indonesia

You know of anymore?

The 4 May 1978 Cassinga raid. This is me as part of the attack company jumping into an enemy base early in the morning. 367 paratroopers attacked a fortified enemy base of about 3000 enemy. They surrendered after 600 were killed. A Cuban armored column coming to the enemies rescue comprising 4 tanks and 18 APCs was also wiped out by the paratroopers. Extraction of the attacking force was by helicopter as the action took place 250km behind enemy lines.

johca
1 September 2014, 20:48
Essentially the older guys took a civilian product and adapted it for a military purpose.]My first sport rig circa 1976 was a 28 foot emergency bailout canopy with emergency bailout harness modified with sleeve to be a free fall rig. Sleeve and modification were done by the local FAA rigger.

Most of the very early sport parachutes were military surplus equipment modified for sport use.

During the post WWII 1940s and 1950s it was a flip of the coin of if the PJ team was more active in dog sled races or sport parachute competitions.

From the Air Force policy implemented in 195O for PJs:

.17.5.2 It is not required that a free fall parachute Jump be made for training purposes; however, one free fall jump per team member is per year is authorized if such is desired by the team member and only at such time S.O.P. exists within the Air Rescue Service.

This extract from 25 March 2014 recollections of others discloses how most of the PJs did their skydiving when they went TDY.

Pappy LaCasse was station with Randy and sent the following. “Randy and I were stationed together at Ramey AFB in Puerto Rico 1958-9 and Bergstrom AFB TX in 1960. During this time they supported the U-2 program in South America.

Randy was an avid skydiver. Randy and Wayne Timbrook would take the aircrew chutes off the SC 54 on Saturday mornings and take them to free fall with the Argentine free fall club. They would get the chute repacked and back on the aircraft that night before anyone knew.

johca
1 September 2014, 21:05
Even the AF controller for the heavy equipment drop jumped in with the paratroopers.This by the way is supposedly the first operational (not a training or for pay jump) done by AF CCT.

Operational Employment of the Airborne Brigade Combat Team: The 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment as a Case Study (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CCYQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fusacac.army.mil%2Fcac2%2Fcgsc%2Fs ams%2Fmedia%2Fmonographs%2Fkonzm-21may09.pdf&ei=OQcFVN7iHoO2ogS1_ILgAw&usg=AFQjCNE0ItJozy-2HhMURMOKYVPdfF0JUw&sig2=72TMrASpE2ZP-laC1miR2A&bvm=bv.74115972,d.cGU)

page 31--"To minimize the chance of compromise, no pathfinder or combat control team (CCT) elements were on the ground prior to the jump."

page 31--"At 0925, eight C-130s delivered heavy drop platforms while five minutes later, two additional aircraft with container delivery system (CDS) dropped equipment and supplies. These equipment and supply drops were controlled by a CCT which had jumped in with TF 2-503."

Also:

Miller, Charles E., Lt Col, USAF. Airlift Doctrine, Air University Press, Maxwell AFB, Alabama, March 1988.

Junction City---The C-130 assault force operated from Bien Hoa, with the drop zone (DZ) near Katasm. The force consisted of 26 C-130s—all to drop the 2d Battalion, 503d Infantry, of the 173d Brigade on 22 Feb 1967. An airborne forward controller communicated with the formation by radio and set off colored smoke bombs to confirm the DZ. The 780 men who jumped from 16 C-130s landed exactly where they were supposed to. There was no enemy fire.

The Air Force combat control team that had jumped with the Army marked the impact point for the equipment drop. Eight C-130s dropped equipment, and two executed container delivery system (CDS) drops—over 80 tons altogether. Five aircraft received hits but all 10 returned to Bien Hoa for reloading for another container drop. Load recovery in the DZ was somewhat troublesome. The initial CDS loads were heavily damaged and some loads landed in a nearby swampy area.

The Air Force Combat Control Team (CCT) had to borrow a radio from a forward air controller to improve their ground to air communications. Follow-up supplies during the next six days started with many inaccurate drops but generally improved with time.

Department of the Army. Combat After Action Report- Junction City. HQ 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate), 8 August 1967.

7. A Combat Control Team was not used for the personnel drop. A FAC marked the IP with rockets and the lead men in the first stick then threw smoke marking their impact point so the aircraft could adjust if necessary for the second pass. This procedure worked very well. The CCT jumped in the second pass and were used for control of the heavy drop and resupply drops that continued the day. It should be kept in mind that if a CCT is used, they have to be put in at least 20 minutes prior to drop time. Putting them in ahead of the drop could alert the enemy and give him time to react and close on the DZ. In instances where the DZ is clearly defined and there is little likelihood of dropping in the wrong place, it is felt that there is no requirement for a CCT to go in ahead of the personnel jump.


This fear of DZ compromise is why no pathfinders were used for the combat jumps during the Korean War. Clearly disclosed in the mission planning and mission after action reports.

The Fat Guy
1 September 2014, 21:07
Here is a link to a recreation of a MACVSOG Jump. (http://www.modernforces.com/SOG_halo_1.htm)

Frank was my class tac in HALO chool. He jumped up on a 25k O2 jump to unfuck a student preparing to jump and unplugged his O2 line and then passed out on the ramp.

He was a hard old dude for sure.

johca
1 September 2014, 21:38
@airbornelawyer:

11-24-1964 340 Belgian Paracommandos, Stanleyville Congo (Operation Dragon Rouge / Operation Red Dragon) There were three large scale Belgian parachutes operation conducted during 1964 in the Congo. At Paulis in the Orientale Province, at Stanleyville in the Orientale Province, and at Kamina in the Katanga Province.

johca
1 September 2014, 22:02
USAF Pararescue's military parachuting activities are generally not large scale (many jumpers in number) parachute operations. Typically only two jumpers and sometimes perhaps six. The mission jumps are not indexed for easy finding in archived documents, especially if it didn't get reported in the news.

PJ Heritage, a tribute (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgn5OAbr-Rk) <--a video

http://alaska.net/~jcassidy/pdf_files/Severied%20rescue%20mission.pdf This document is about the first parachute rescue team doing a rescue in Japanese occupied and controlled territory in CBI theater during WWII.

USAF Pararescue’s Team Player History of Role and Mission Crossover Utilization (http://alaska.net/~jcassidy/pdf_files/PJs%20Korean%20War.pdf) This document gives a summary of how the pararescue career field continued on after WWII being involved in the Korean War and other mission utilizations since WWII.