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blueseas
15 October 2006, 22:03
As you can see this is my first time posting here although I have been reading these boards for several years now. For anyone who is in the Long Island area the Patchogue Post Office Dedication for Lt. Michael Murphy will be held on Tuesday, October 24 @11:00 a.m. Such a great honor for a true American hero.

Okay got that first post over with, maybe the second one will be eaiser!!

Kath

blueseas
15 October 2006, 22:17
So sorry I thought that little winkie eye was going by my name, tried to remove it. So, so sorry. kath

Typhoon
15 October 2006, 22:21
I recall how Patchogue came out to honor Lt. Murphy at his funeral. It was a moving experience to see the pictures from that day. I am glad to hear of the dedication of the federal building in his honor.

JustANavyMom
16 October 2006, 17:58
As you can see this is my first time posting here although I have been reading these boards for several years now. For anyone who is in the Long Island area the Patchogue Post Office Dedication for Lt. Michael Murphy will be held on Tuesday, October 24 @11:00 a.m. Such a great honor for a true American hero.

Okay got that first post over with, maybe the second one will be eaiser!!

Kath

Thanks for that info Kath

NYDoorkicker
27 October 2006, 13:23
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisland/ny-liseal254947209oct25,0,7519471.story

Fallen Naval officer honored

BY BART JONES
Newsday Staff Writer

October 25, 2006

After Michael P. Murphy became a Navy SEAL, he spoke with his father about the dangers he faced - and why he wouldn't back down.

"Dad, I'm not trying to die," his father, Daniel Murphy, of Patchogue, recalled his son saying. "But I want you to know that I love what I do. And God forbid the worst should happen, understand it will have happened doing what I love."

The worst did happen on June 25, 2005, when Lt. Murphy was killed during a reconnaissance mission in Afghanistan hunting down Taliban and al-Qaida insurgents. Yesterday, the Patchogue Post Office was renamed in his honor, and his parents, Daniel and Maureen, and brother, John, watched as politicians, including Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, paid tribute to the fallen 29-year-old.

"We know we can never undo the loss of your son," Clinton said under a white tent set up on Main Street as hundreds - among them Navy Seal comrades and local veterans - looked on. But Michael Murphy "did not shy away from any challenge ... He represents the best we have."

Rep. Timothy Bishop (D-Southampton), who proposed the federal legislation renaming the post office in Murphy's name, said, "This is a small way to honor and thank a Long Island hero for his valor and sacrifice."

The renaming of the post office is the latest posthumous honor for Murphy, whose name also graces the baseball field in Patchogue where he played as a child and the beach at Lake Ronkonkoma where he worked as a lifeguard.

Rear Adm. Joseph Maguire, head of the SEALs, who flew in for the ceremony from their headquarters in San Diego, said the flood of honors bestowed on Murphy was unusual even for a SEAL.

"I've never seen anything like the outpouring here," he said.

Maguire described Murphy as one of the best in the SEALs, an elite, secretive branch of the Navy made up of only 1,800 enlisted men and 400 officers who take part in covert operations, often behind enemy lines. As their name implies, their theaters of operation include the sea, air and land.

Murphy was killed after his four-man reconnaissance mission came under attack near the Afghan-Pakistani border. After he called for backup, a rescue helicopter carrying eight SEALs and eight members of the Army's Special Forces was dispatched but shot down as it landed. All aboard were killed. Only one member of Murphy's unit survived.

After he graduated from Patchogue-Medford High School, where he played varsity football, and Penn State University with honors, Murphy was accepted to three law schools and had a promising legal career ahead of him, his father said.

He joined the SEALs instead, in December 2000.

"He fit more into 29 years than most people ever see," his father said.
Copyright 2006 Newsday Inc.