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-   Book Reviews (http://www.socnet.com/forumdisplay.php?f=226)
-   -   What are you reading? (http://www.socnet.com/showthread.php?t=40592)

tm3e 3 January 2020 00:43

"The Conspiracy Against The Human Race by Thomas Ligotti. Very depressing, full of words I have to look up. If you ever wondered where True Detective Rust Cohle's nihilistic rumination got plagiarised from this is the book.

jhes160 3 January 2020 11:02

"Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History" by S.C. Gwynne.

Started a few days ago and holy shit! The Comanches were brutal, but phenomenal warriors. Quanah was arguably their greatest chief and was a half breed.

The vast, semi-arid grasslands of the southern Great Plains could be dominated by hunters and warriors on horseback. In the first half of the nineteenth century, the Comanches, often referred to as “lords of the Plains,” were the single most powerful military force in the region, to the frustration of both the Mexican and U.S. governments. In this engrossing chronicle, award-winning journalist Gwynne traces the rise of the Comanche people from their roots as primitive bands of hunter-gatherers to their mastery of the horse and emergence as the feared power brokers of the area. At the center of the narrative is the charismatic Quanah Parker, who skillfully navigated the gaps between his traditional culture and the emerging, settled culture of the late-nineteenth century. Quanah was the son of a Comanche warrior and a woman named Cynthia Ann Parker, who was kidnapped at the age of nine and chose to stay with the Comanches. Quanah was a brilliant, feared war chief who guided his people in adapting to new realities after their final suppression by the U.S. Calvary. An outstanding addition to western-history collections. --Jay Freeman

schibbs 8 January 2020 07:47

^^That is some cool history right there. The exploits of all the tribes of this country has held my interest for years, and I have barely made a dent in the readings of such!

UncleTx 8 January 2020 20:09

Just finished a very in depth book on the history of the Comanches.
Comanches: The History of a People by T.R. Fehrenbach

Armitage12 9 January 2020 17:57

Don Mann and Lance Burton, Navy SEALs: The Combat History of the Deadliest Warriors on the Planet (Skyhorse Publishing, 2019).

Skip it. I picked it up based on a quick positive blurb in the last issue of Proceedings and I wanted to take notes from it. I'm glad I got it through the library. The text is a poor crib of other materials, some apparently the official history put out by Naval Special Warfare Command, some from elsewhere. In the opening chapters, the historical chronology is all over the place so it became downright puzzling what they were trying to explain. Somehow the Goldwater-Nichols Act of 1986 led to the creation of the position of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The combat narrative shows a desire by the authors to tell a riveting story, but we really don't know the back and forth spoken words between UDT operatives in February 1951 in combat.

If you guys are on here, I'm sorry, but this just didn't work. I had to quit halfway through. You needed an editor to help you sort this out in drafts.

jerome 12 January 2020 21:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by jhes160 (Post 1058835186)
"Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History" by S.C. Gwynne.

Started a few days ago and holy shit! The Comanches were brutal, but phenomenal warriors. Quanah was arguably their greatest chief and was a half breed.

The vast, semi-arid grasslands of the southern Great Plains could be dominated by hunters and warriors on horseback. In the first half of the nineteenth century, the Comanches, often referred to as “lords of the Plains,” were the single most powerful military force in the region, to the frustration of both the Mexican and U.S. governments. In this engrossing chronicle, award-winning journalist Gwynne traces the rise of the Comanche people from their roots as primitive bands of hunter-gatherers to their mastery of the horse and emergence as the feared power brokers of the area. At the center of the narrative is the charismatic Quanah Parker, who skillfully navigated the gaps between his traditional culture and the emerging, settled culture of the late-nineteenth century. Quanah was the son of a Comanche warrior and a woman named Cynthia Ann Parker, who was kidnapped at the age of nine and chose to stay with the Comanches. Quanah was a brilliant, feared war chief who guided his people in adapting to new realities after their final suppression by the U.S. Calvary. An outstanding addition to western-history collections. --Jay Freeman

I also just finished this book, great read. It's amazing how the settlers had to constantly relearn how to operate in the environment. Then the corruption out of DC was unbelievable.

MixedLoad 13 January 2020 00:48

Quote:

Originally Posted by jerome (Post 1058836976)
I also just finished this book, great read. It's amazing how the settlers had to constantly relearn how to operate in the environment. Then the corruption out of DC was unbelievable.

Thanks for that. I just downloaded it on Audible!

MixedLoad 13 January 2020 00:51

Just finished "Extreme Ownership" by Jocko Willink and Leif Babbin. I thought it was an excellent book. For years I refused to consider reading it because I was tired of "I am SOF, let me tell you about leadership" books. There were simply too many.

But just like Paul Howe's "Leadership lessons for the fight" and Pete Blaber's "The Mission, the Men, and Me" I find "Extreme Ownership" to have been an incredibly astute observation of lessons which can be related to any environment.

Two thumbs up.

MixedLoad 13 January 2020 00:53

Currently about halfway through "Permanent Record" by Ed Snowden. It's been ok and I'm considering returning it to Audible if I don't see it improving in the next half hour or so. He's currently covering his time in Switzerland and makes some interesting points.

GirlwithaGlock 17 January 2020 21:04

I am reading the autobiography of Agatha Christie. Not surprisingly, it is delightfully light-hearted and full of good humor.

Agatha’s voyage down the memory lane begins in her little mud-brick “house” in Nimrud (as I am sure most of you know, she actively participated in some of the archeological work uncovering the ruins of ancient Mesopotamia)... I cant but wonder what she would say of the current state of affairs in Iraq.

Polypro 18 January 2020 15:14

1 Attachment(s)
Finishing it up. Big.Brass.Balls. the lot of them.

TX teacher 4 February 2020 23:06

Been working on a new book the past few weeks, "Waffen SS" by Adrian Gilbert. I'm up to Operation Barbarossa and it's been a pretty good, neutral read.

He does paint them as war criminals, while at the same time explaining their role when functioning with the army. He doesn't apologize for their actions, but does explain the Wehrmacht was also guilty, although on a much smaller scale of war crimes. He also gets into the politics of the origin, the role with the SA, and like I said their role within the army as well.

Good read for WWII buffs.

Fire-Gunner 7 February 2020 15:24

"A World Slowed", by Rick Tippins.
Excellent book, written by a friend of mine, about survival after a solar flare/EMP event.

CAP MARINE 11 February 2020 12:11

Not a book, but a LE course on PTSD(CLEET-Okla)

Armitage12 11 February 2020 13:43

Ian T. Brown, A New Conception of War: John Boyd, the U.S. Marines, and Maneuver Warfare. Looked interesting.

J.P.26 11 February 2020 22:01

"A History of the English Speaking Peoples" by Winston Churchill

Armitage12 11 February 2020 23:29

That’s a good set to read. It will show you how to write well.

Xdeth 12 February 2020 00:04

"Grant" by Ron Chernow, still chipping away at this one.

bounceandburst 14 February 2020 22:46

Night of The Silver Stars.. The Battle of Lang Vei.

IronCross 15 February 2020 01:36

Rich Dad Poor Dad. by Robert Kiyosaki.


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