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  #1  
Old 14 November 2011, 16:06
Axman Axman is offline
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Anybody have a copy of Arabic learning material?

Looking to see if anybody has any Arabic learning material they want to sell or part with?

Like Rosetta stone or something of that nature?

Thanks,

Ax
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  #2  
Old 15 November 2011, 06:39
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Sir,

If you have access to AKO, Rosetta Stone is there for free, and yes they have Arabic learning material. You just need your AKO username and E-Learning Password.
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Old 15 November 2011, 07:09
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The Army no longer uses Rosetta Stone, but DLI provides online learning resources.
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Old 15 November 2011, 07:28
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If you have a .mil email address, check out SOFTS (Special Operations Forces Teletraining System)

Also, there's the Joint Language University. I am using both to assist with my Spanish language stuff.
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Old 15 November 2011, 09:13
Axman Axman is offline
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Thanks guys, I'll look into all of the above options. Is there any place that lets you download material to an Ipod or something of that nature?

I did sign up for livemocha.com, not to bad for free.

I start classes online with AMU Dec. 5th, for my BA in Middle Eastern Studies. Part of the curriculum is learning Arabic and Middle Eastern culture, hoping to get a jump on the reading and writing part.


Thanks,

Ax

Last edited by Axman; 15 November 2011 at 09:15.
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  #6  
Old 15 November 2011, 10:06
Axman Axman is offline
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Edit:

Tried to sign up for the SOFTS classes and my internet connection didn't meet the needed requirements. I guess I saw that coming. The net is pretty bad at my current location.

That's why I need good ole fashioned reading material, or even tapes, CDs or downloadable stuff. Shit I'll go find an old tape player if I have to.
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  #7  
Old 16 November 2011, 15:38
avgjoe0311 avgjoe0311 is offline
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I have some books from a few Arabic courses I have taken. I will look for them this weekend and PM you.
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Old 16 November 2011, 15:44
Magyc Magyc is offline
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I have used Pimsleur CDs (which are ~$30 for 16 CDs) and found them helpful. Just convert the CDs to MP3 and listen. Part of the exercise (as most language learning tools will do) has you talking outloud. So I find the Pimsleur stuff great in the car...while at the workplace not so much :)
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Old 16 November 2011, 16:24
Axman Axman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avgjoe0311 View Post
I have some books from a few Arabic courses I have taken. I will look for them this weekend and PM you.
Thanks bro. let me know if you dig anything up. I might order some books from Amazon also.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magyc View Post
I have used Pimsleur CDs (which are ~$30 for 16 CDs) and found them helpful. Just convert the CDs to MP3 and listen. Part of the exercise (as most language learning tools will do) has you talking outloud. So I find the Pimsleur stuff great in the car...while at the workplace not so much :)
I'll look into that, thanks.


I did find an Arabic speaking "friend" yesterday. We have been going over some of the words,phrases; and some reading and writing. Talking to a real person from the region you work in, is for sure the way to go. I learn more talking to her in a hour, then anything else I've tried.
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Old 19 November 2011, 18:43
Axman Axman is offline
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Anybody have any MP3 files I can grab up Via email?
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  #11  
Old 22 December 2011, 09:32
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Axman, I've been wanting to learn Arabic as well. My interpreter has been teaching me a few words and phrases each day when we're out on mission.

My internet connection is crap too, so if you find some tapes or books that prove very useful to you let me know ok?
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Old 22 December 2011, 15:58
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I did find this, downloadable material that may help.

Its the Pimsleur material Magyc had mentioned

http://www.audiobookscorner.com/titl...titleId=508944
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  #13  
Old 26 December 2011, 12:52
mbmx13 mbmx13 is offline
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I have found some great downloadable language material on http://www.openculture.com

Here are some Arabic websites that my Arabic teacher from Cal State gave us:

http://www.languageguide.org/index.jsp
http://www.languageguide.org/arabic/grammar/
http://www.happychild.org.uk/freeway/arabic/index.htm
http://afl.sakhr.com/
http://www.schoolarabia.net/map_site/asasi/arabic_1.htm
http://funwitharabic.com
http://wordchamp.com

We use "Ahlan Wa Sahlan" Workbook and Textbook for our Basic Arabic courses. It comes with the CD-ROM and DVD.

Also, here is a basic list of phrases using transliteration (MSA):

Phrases
Expressions - 1
Marhaba (hello)

Ahlen (reply to hello)

As-salaamu alaykum (Peace be upon you ? Another way and most popular way to say hello)

Wa Alaykum as-salaam (and upon you be peace -reply hello)

Ismee ? (My name is ?)

Mas-Muka (what's your name - male)?

Mas-Muke (what's your name - female)?

Ana min ?. (I am from ?)

Min Ayna Anta (where are you from - male)?

Min Ayna Ante (where are you from - female)

Ana Umree ? ( I am ? old)

Kam Umruka (how old are you ? male)?

Kam Umruke (how old are you ? female)?


Kayfal-Haal? (both genders) How is it going?

Keef Halak? (Male - colloquial) (how are you?)

Keef Halek (female - colloquial) (how are you)?

Kayfa Haluka (Male) How are you?

Kayfa Halukee (female) How are you?

Mneeh (fine male - colloquial)

Mneeha (fine female - colloquial)

Alhamdulillah (all praise be to God - also means fine)

Shway Shway (so so)

Admeen (bad)

Shukran (thank you)

Hal Indaka Su'al? DO you have a question (asking a male)

Hal Indeke Su'al? DO you have a question (asking a female)

Indee Su'al (I have a question)

Na'am (yes)

Aywa (yes)

La' (no)

Kalla (no)

Ma Ma'na ... ?(What does ... mean)

Tacharrafna (Nice meeting you)

Hope that helps!
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Old 26 December 2011, 13:00
mbmx13 mbmx13 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axman View Post
Thanks guys, I'll look into all of the above options. Is there any place that lets you download material to an Ipod or something of that nature?

I did sign up for livemocha.com, not to bad for free.

I start classes online with AMU Dec. 5th, for my BA in Middle Eastern Studies. Part of the curriculum is learning Arabic and Middle Eastern culture, hoping to get a jump on the reading and writing part.


Thanks,

Ax
FYI, I got my BA from AMU and took both Arabic classes. I had to buy a book on writing the Arabic language since that isn't part of the curriculum. I am currently taking Arabic at Cal State and within the first few weeks I gained more fluency and proficiency than I did through the two Arabic courses at AMU combined. What was missing was the interactive component necessary for achieving fluency. AMU uses Rosetta Stone BTW but I feel that Rosetta Stone is not a good program and based on my knowledge of linguistics, it can't provide the necessary tools to achieve the fluency desired through a language program. I feel that taking Arabic online will only help with memorization of vocabulary and some of the sounds but sounds like the Ayn and Gayn are hard to grasp when attending online language learning not to mention the 3 H sounds. My suggestion would be to take the language class locally or stick with your friend teaching you the language or finding a local tutor.
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Old 26 December 2011, 14:34
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your post
thanks! I will try to memorize those
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  #16  
Old 26 December 2011, 22:29
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MacDuff MacDuff is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbmx13 View Post
Also, here is a basic list of phrases using transliteration (MSA):


Ahlen (reply to hello)

As-salaamu alaykum (Peace be upon you ? Another way and most popular way to say hello)

Wa Alaykum as-salaam (and upon you be peace -reply hello)

Ismee ? (My name is ?)
Thanks for reminding me why I hate transliteration. It's hard to transfer the Arabic vowelling into English and have it still be understandable when you read it. This is a great list of words but I would recommend finding somewhere online that you can listen to the words being pronounced because for a lot of those it's hard to really write them in English.

Honestly I wouldn't worry so much about learning words all that much. I'd worry more about the beginning stuff like learning the alphabet. Focus on recognizing letters in the initial, medial, and final positions and the sounds that they make. Practice writing them and reading them in words. BBC Arabic is a good reference, don't worry so much about what the words mean, just worry about recognizing the letters and how they fit together. This will put you well ahead of your class, probably more so than knowing a few random words and phrases.

I just realized I forgot to add a link. Here's a good link for learning the letters, their sounds, and their positions. http://searchtruth.com/arabic/lessons/unit1_writing.php
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Last edited by MacDuff; 26 December 2011 at 22:52.
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  #17  
Old 27 December 2011, 09:00
mbmx13 mbmx13 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacDuff View Post
Thanks for reminding me why I hate transliteration. It's hard to transfer the Arabic vowelling into English and have it still be understandable when you read it. This is a great list of words but I would recommend finding somewhere online that you can listen to the words being pronounced because for a lot of those it's hard to really write them in English.

Honestly I wouldn't worry so much about learning words all that much. I'd worry more about the beginning stuff like learning the alphabet. Focus on recognizing letters in the initial, medial, and final positions and the sounds that they make. Practice writing them and reading them in words. BBC Arabic is a good reference, don't worry so much about what the words mean, just worry about recognizing the letters and how they fit together. This will put you well ahead of your class, probably more so than knowing a few random words and phrases.

I just realized I forgot to add a link. Here's a good link for learning the letters, their sounds, and their positions. http://searchtruth.com/arabic/lessons/unit1_writing.php
I agree 100% with MacDuff! Transliteration works okay for beginners but then you need to force yourself to forget about transliteration as soon as you learn the entire alphabet (initial, middle and final). You will find some students using transliteration as a crutch and not wanting to just sound out the letters with the short vowels (ah, ee, and ooh). Just wait until you get to reading media such as newspapers, they don't use the short vowels and so the only way to understand which word it is would be to understand the context. But that is much later down the road.

Arabic is a pretty easy straightforward language unlike English and as long as you understand the Alphabet, the one-way connectors, the short vowels, etc then you will be on your way towards proficiency. The main component that has to be present for near-native fluency in any language is person-to-person human interaction. This is one of the reasons why Rosetta Stone falls short of being a good language program.
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