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  #1  
Old 20 July 2010, 00:29
infmedic infmedic is offline
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FBI Surveillance Specialist

Not sure if this would be a good forum for this, but saw the posting on USAJOBS and was curious if anyone on here had any insight into this job. Is it a BS gig or something worth checking out, etc...

I did a search and not much came up.

Thanks in advance...
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  #2  
Old 20 July 2010, 02:13
phoenixtriad phoenixtriad is offline
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I know a couple folks who have gone down that route. It is an excellent stepping stone to other opportunities within the Bureau or DoJ. The hiring standards are about the same as an 1811 I believe. From day one of the process you need to give it your 110% and no less. Interview process can be tough, and believe me every minute detail of your appearance will be noted and speak volumes about your seriousness. I think the mobility agreement depends on which office you work in; I believe one person I know said he had to sign one, while others did not.
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  #3  
Old 20 July 2010, 19:15
robbcat robbcat is offline
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Do you need a degree? Does veterans preference help?
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  #4  
Old 20 July 2010, 21:06
infmedic infmedic is offline
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Phoenix, thanks for the info.

I don't believe you need a degree, just some relative experience. I applied for this job in '08 and got called for an interview, but I was working for BW in Baghdad at the time and they said they couldn't accmodate the interview.

I'm going to try again and see what happens. It's hard to read through USAJobs lingo initially, but I'm almost positive you don't need a degree.
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  #5  
Old 20 July 2010, 21:13
bubblehead bubblehead is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robbcat View Post
Do you need a degree? Does veterans preference help?
Yes, you need a degree if you do not have relevant experience; and yes, Veteran's preference always helps.

Quote:
GS 7: $33,979.00 - $44,176.00
GS 9: $41,563.00 - $54,028.00

GS-7 the applicant must have one year of specialized experience at
least equivalent to the GS-5 level. Specialized experience is
performing analytical duties directly related to the collection and
evaluation of information.

GS-9 the applicant must have one year of specialized experience at
least equivalent to the GS-7 level. Specialized experience is
performing investigative, surveillance, technical and/or analytical
duties directly related to the collection and evaluation of
intelligence information.

Education requirement needed in lieu of specialized experience
listed below:

GS-7 level: Applicant must have one full year of graduate level
education or superior academic achievement. Superior Academic
Achievement is the completion of all of the requirements for a
bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, which is
based on (1) class standing, (2) grade-point average (3.0 or higher
as recorded on an official transcript, or as based on courses
completed during the final 2 years of the curriculum), or (3) honor
society membership.

GS-9 level: Applicant must have two full academic years of graduate
education, Master's or equivalent graduate, e.g. LL.B or J.D.
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  #6  
Old 20 July 2010, 22:17
Decon Decon is offline
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It is not a quick in and out or up position. Have to stay in the program for awhile before you can transfer. Atleast in the past. Same with the Investigative Specialist
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  #7  
Old 21 July 2010, 07:32
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Surveillance is mostly tedium and discomfort with occasional flashes of adreneline. If MICECP positions are available in surveillance, you would at least be a GG11.

Consider that you will spend long periods of time in a car, peeing into a can just waiting for someone to leave their home/place of work. Not so bad for a guy..sucks if you are female. And heaven help you if You are the one who loses the guy/girl.

Anyway, it sounds cool, but reality is a bit different after the newness wears off after a month.
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  #8  
Old 21 July 2010, 07:44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Purple36 View Post
Anyway, it sounds cool, but reality is a bit different after the newness wears off after a month.



Amen. It's that way with a lot of stuff in this line of work.
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  #9  
Old 21 July 2010, 11:42
mbmx13 mbmx13 is offline
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It sounds similar to my current work as a Private Investigator. I imagine you probably work in teams of 4-5 or more so it shouldn't be that easy to lose someone, right?

I deal with mostly individual clients and they can only afford 1, possibly 2 people on a surveillance. We lose people all the time, it is the nature of our business because it is better to lose someone then to get burned, but I would imagine losing someone in an FBI operation would be detrimental to the operation in most respects.

Oh, and in California, GPS can't be used unless the registered owner of the car is also the client or the lessor or lessee. I would love the opportunity to slap on GPS trackers but in the last 3 years, I have worked 1 case per year with the GPS tracking device. I am looking at it right now, sitting in the box, unused.

Best of luck to you, surveillance is what you make of it and it helps to have a partner who you get along with so that you won't be bored or a good self-help CD or talk program to keep your mind focused on the task at hand.

Just my two cents!
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  #10  
Old 24 July 2010, 21:19
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Believeraz Believeraz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbmx13 View Post
It sounds similar to my current work as a Private Investigator. I imagine you probably work in teams of 4-5 or more so it shouldn't be that easy to lose someone, right?
It's very different to follow someone who's not aware or mildly suspicious, versus a professional who's trained to detect, confuse, and evade you...or perform their tradecraft right under your nose without you detecting it.
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  #11  
Old 2 September 2010, 21:39
mbmx13 mbmx13 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Believeraz View Post
It's very different to follow someone who's not aware or mildly suspicious, versus a professional who's trained to detect, confuse, and evade you...or perform their tradecraft right under your nose without you detecting it.
Great response! I wasn't thinking about that. The closest I have gotten to that type of person is when you have a tweaker that keeps checking the rear view mirror or someone who is versed in sdrs. But you are right, probably 90% of people don't even look for surveillance in my line of work. I found myself a few weeks ago getting paid $100 plus mileage to sit at the pool in my bathing suit while videotaping activity on a covert camera. I sure do love the variety a PI license allows me.

Back to the post, so if I am understanding right, this position is sitting in an office looking at cameras or inside a surveillance van watching cameras? Am I right?
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  #12  
Old 21 July 2010, 15:27
Just Another Guy Just Another Guy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Purple36 View Post
Surveillance is mostly tedium and discomfort with occasional flashes of adreneline. If MICECP positions are available in surveillance, you would at least be a GG11.

Consider that you will spend long periods of time in a car, peeing into a can just waiting for someone to leave their home/place of work. Not so bad for a guy..sucks if you are female. And heaven help you if You are the one who loses the guy/girl.

Anyway, it sounds cool, but reality is a bit different after the newness wears off after a month.
When I was doing a little surveillance for the State of Florida, an old intel guy (who was in the 8240th in Korea and did a lot of it in Europe over the years) gave me a DEPENDS. True story. RIP John Altano.
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  #13  
Old 21 July 2010, 18:27
infmedic infmedic is offline
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Is there a big difference between the investigative specialist and the surveillance job?

Again, thanks for all the solid info. I appreciate it...
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  #14  
Old 21 July 2010, 18:53
Gunpoint Gunpoint is offline
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SS is static.

IS is mobile, vehicle-based surveillance. More interesting in my opinion, better training.
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  #15  
Old 21 July 2010, 15:11
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Blackjack78 Blackjack78 is offline
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Surveillance Specialist is a fixed surveillance platform supporting the FCI mission. There is a mobility signing requirement and you have to commit to two years before you seek a position with better opportunities for advancement.
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  #16  
Old 3 September 2010, 17:17
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As I understood it, the mobile surveillance specialists in the FBI always came from a wide range of people, the better to mix it up as they shadow their target.

You could have a middle aged, frumpy looking woman walking parrallel and in the same direction on the other side of the street, a hip hop looking black man wearing headphones be bopping toward the target on the same sidewalk, and a couple looking like tourists just waiting for him to reach the end of the block.

It takes all kinds. The British supposedly have this all down to a science with what they refer to as their "watchers".
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  #17  
Old 6 September 2010, 13:17
Cubbies Suck Cubbies Suck is offline
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I would love to apply for and obtain this job. I have extensive experience on surveillances, the longest lasting six days. But I doubt they would take me. Too old I'm sure.
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  #18  
Old 6 September 2010, 13:25
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Gray Rhyno Gray Rhyno is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubbies Suck View Post
I would love to apply for and obtain this job. I have extensive experience on surveillances, the longest lasting six days. But I doubt they would take me. Too old I'm sure.
For support positions like this, there isn't an age policy like there is for SA.
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  #19  
Old 6 September 2010, 15:31
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Blackjack78 Blackjack78 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubbies Suck View Post
I would love to apply for and obtain this job. I have extensive experience on surveillances, the longest lasting six days. But I doubt they would take me. Too old I'm sure.
Apply, all they can say is no.

Last edited by Blackjack78; 6 September 2010 at 15:47. Reason: Second thoughts
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  #20  
Old 7 September 2010, 19:24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubbies Suck View Post
I would love to apply for and obtain this job. I have extensive experience on surveillances, the longest lasting six days. But I doubt they would take me. Too old I'm sure.
On the contrary, being older would be beneficial, as long as you were in reasonably good shape.

Whoever you were tailing probably wouldn't expect somebody older. Throw in a Cubs cap, and you'd be good to go.
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