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  #101  
Old 6 August 2013, 22:16
CAMedic CAMedic is offline
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I got my Masters at AMU. I learned quite a bit and have used my skool larnin' and cypherin' many times! More than happy. You get out what you put in.
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  #102  
Old 18 May 2016, 23:58
WS-G WS-G is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DC View Post
...during my search I found many employers who discriminated against BAs. The job requirements often would require a BS vice a BA with few or no other stipulations as far as type of degree. It was never the reverse though (requiring a BA vice a BS). Obviously this will depend greatly on what you want to do....
I see this a lot as well. However I did see a position vacancy announcement last year where the reverse was true. The position -- which was quickly filled -- was at Oregon State University's agricultural research station in Hermiston, OR. The announcement specifically demanded a BA in biology, with an agronomy emphasis and past work experience involving the use and maintenance of farm machinery. My guess was that this was most likely a support position created for someone's relative or cronie.
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  #103  
Old 19 May 2016, 00:47
WS-G WS-G is offline
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A very dated discussion, but some valid red flags are raised with this "professor". My comments are in red boldface. The Peter puffage is strong with this one....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharky View Post
Here's an example of one of their professors puffing up his resume....LOL


Larry M Forness

Dr. Forness was the Founder of the National Center for Sports Medicine and it’s Director for more than ten years. It is very possible to set oneself up as a founder of an organization of one, and it's always possible to call it whatever one wishes. Is it really national-level in its extent, or only because the letterhead says so?

While at the National Center for Sports Medicine, he developed the L.I.F.E. Test, a set of clinical tests, measurements and examinations that determine a person's true (biophysiological) age. Not a lot of evidence-based, peer-reviewed validation to say the least


He is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine and holds its highest-level certification--Director of Health and Fitness; one of fewer than 250 healthcare specialists in the world to hold that distinction. This certification was retired by the ACSM quite some time ago and is no longer issued. "Health and Fitness Director" was the correct title, by the way. This was geared towards the kinesiology and exercise science people. Read that: phys ed with textbooks. Having this one doesn't make anybody anywhere close to being a sports physician. See for yourselves: http://certification.acsm.org/other-acsm-certifications


Dr. Forness is a member of Physicians and Scientists for Responsible Application of Science and Technology (PSRAST) (...and a very poorly constructed website they have: PSRAST), American Medical Informatics Association; the American Society for Human Genetics; the American Society for Law, Medicine and Ethics; the Federation of American Society for Experimental Biology, the National Council for Reliable Health Information (all of these are open to non-clinicians and non-scientists -- pay your money and get a subscription to their journal); and Mensa (seriously? -- their membership includes many a socially dysfunctional type, as well as the incarcerated), as well as being a certified Healthcare Accountant and Financial Manager (this says administrative support role, not a patient-care or clinical research role, and a very peripheral one at that). Dr. Forness took his first course via distance education at age 20. In the intervening years, he has earned six degrees via distance education, has been an adjunct faculty member at various universities for nearly a decade, and was a Dean of Distance Education at a major healthcare university (which one? -- a bit vague!) in the southeastern United States. He possesses nine earned degrees, which include three Doctorates. In what? This seems intentionally vague as well, but I have this feeling that none of them include MD, DO, OD, DVM, PharmD or PsyD.


He did his undergraduate training (in what?) at Notre Dame (but did he graduate there?) .... He also earned two Law degrees (JD and LL.M.) (which says he wasn't up to much as a life scientist or clinical researcher). His latest book, Don't Get Duped! A Consumer's Guide to Health and Fitness (about fraud and deception in the health and fitness industry... and now he can say he wrote the book on it!), was published by Prometheus Books in January 2002 He is a former United States Marine, a sport parachutist, a licensed pilot (with Instrument Rating) (Private Pilot with single-engine and instrument rating, nothing further according to the FAA Airman Registry, and was last issued a medical certificate in 1989. This means he hasn't been legal to use his certificate since 1991.)....
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  #104  
Old 19 May 2016, 01:24
WS-G WS-G is offline
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AMU may have been an all-around good school in the past. I did my Master of Public Health there, and found it to be a good program, from a strictly academic standpoint. I then transitioned to the Master of Science in aerospace science program to use the rest of my GI Bill funds. The latter program was really good at first, but the content has drifted steadily towards a "technical management" focus versus hard science, and I find that quite disappointing. Academically, I have little else but good to say, however the rest is a very different story.

Keep in mind that this school -- while regionally accredited -- is still a so-called "for-profit". IE: their #1 mission is to look after their stockholders and senior executives; all else is secondary. AMU has changed hands more than once and has steadily declined in quality insofar as the administrative support for the student is concerned. They are now traded on the NYSE, and are now the #1 provider of employer-sponsored online educational services for... wait for it!... Walmart!

If you're paying for everything at your own expense, with a full-ride sponsorship from your employer, or with 100% GI Bill funding, everything will go nice and smooth. Those only getting 80% or less on the GI Bill and having to make up the difference with FSA from the Dept. of Education had best be prepared to have some reindeer games played with their funding. My "student account" page there has frequently looked more than anything like a game of three-card Monty, and I have never once spoken to the same person twice in their finance office (they also balk at identifying themselves when asked). Their approach to student services is less "squeaky wheel getting the grease" and more "nail sticking up getting hammered down" -- voice a complaint and they'll figure out a way to make your issue worse. This is not just an AMU issue, it's a recurring theme at for-profit schools in general.


As it stands now, I can no longer recommend this school.
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  #105  
Old 19 May 2016, 05:18
Hostile0311 Hostile0311 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WS-G View Post

If you're paying for everything at your own expense, with a full-ride sponsorship from your employer, or with 100% GI Bill funding, everything will go nice and smooth. Those only getting 80% or less on the GI Bill and having to make up the difference with FSA from the Dept. of Education had best be prepared to have some reindeer games played with their funding. My "student account" page there has frequently looked more than anything like a game of three-card Monty, and I have never once spoken to the same person twice in their finance office (they also balk at identifying themselves when asked). Their approach to student services is less "squeaky wheel getting the grease" and more "nail sticking up getting hammered down" -- voice a complaint and they'll figure out a way to make your issue worse. This is not just an AMU issue, it's a recurring theme at for-profit schools in general.


As it stands now, I can no longer recommend this school.
I'm at 80% and have found the opposite of the issues you've stated above. Every time I have called regarding my student account or my FSA funds if there was an anomaly, I have received nothing but great customer service and almost near instantaneous results. Never once in the last 3 years has someone on the other end of the line failed to identify themselves in the first sentence of the conversation and even when asked later on, never hesitated to give me the first and last name. I have no problem whatsoever recommending this school.
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  #106  
Old 19 May 2016, 10:03
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leopardprey leopardprey is offline
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My suggestion if looking for a online course of study, whether for your bachelors or masters, is to look for a "Brick and Click" school. In other words an established "Brick and Mortar" school that has been around for a long time, established and has the proper credentials. But, has online programs of study and has full time faculty you will deal with. Many well established, private and public universities, these days offer online programs.
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  #107  
Old 20 May 2016, 12:37
20boatguy22 20boatguy22 is offline
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Did my BA with AMU, had nothing but good experiences. Customer service was great - if I called the wrong office, they would transfer me to the right one and I rarely had to sit on hold. I finished 2 years ago, but I can't imagine it changed that much in the meantime.
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  #108  
Old 21 May 2016, 20:45
WS-G WS-G is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20boatguy22 View Post
(your post)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hostile0311 View Post
(your post)
Good to see that both of you had a completely positive experience. My own experience with the financial aid side of the house was quite the opposite. Completing the MPH and then transitioning to an MSc program with a different department was neither smooth nor seamless. Apparently someone in the bureaucracy seemed to think I'd flip-flopped and decided to change my major at the very end when that was actually not the case at all ("What part of my MPH is already completed, and this is an additional postgraduate degree do you people not grasp?"). It took about six months to get that one sorted out.

And yes, I've been kept on hold for the better part of an hour more than once.
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  #109  
Old 7 June 2016, 13:45
k-rub k-rub is offline
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I've been chipping away at a BS in IT Security for a couple years now. Have had no issues whatsoever with using TA or with anything else.

My real question is about the perspective of hiring companies for people with AMU degrees.
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  #110  
Old 6 September 2016, 21:00
99superduty 99superduty is offline
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I completed my MBA with AMU in August. This is my 3rd degree from them...AA in Counter-Terrorism Fundamentals, BA in Management and now an MBA.

What does all this mean? I don't know....its definitely checked the boxes on applications although it wasn't really required for the stuff I was doing downrange.

I just kept going because:

1. AMU was very flexible and I was familiar with the processes.
2. The VA was friggen paying for it and paying me to go to school. I can't imagine how anyone with the post 9/11 GI Bill doesn't use it.

I want to caveat this by saying that I was that dumb ass in boot camp that waived the GI Bill back in the day ('88) thinking that was an extra hundo in beer money every month. I was a high school drop out with zero intentions of setting foot in a classroom again and it was just my luck that I was grandfathered into the GI Bill after 9/11.

In any case, I don't have anything to compare it to as far as other schools but I wouldn't have stayed with AMU if it wasn't a positive experience.
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