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  #781  
Old 13 October 2008, 22:06
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The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger. Got it at Wally World for $5.00. Dull as shit so far, hopefully it picks up.
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  #782  
Old 13 October 2008, 22:22
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Originally Posted by heavyguns1/1 View Post
The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger. Got it at Wally World for $5.00. Dull as shit so far, hopefully it picks up.
I actually enjoyed it for some reason. It's been so long since I've read it though.
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  #783  
Old 13 October 2008, 22:28
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Mornings on Horseback by David McCulloch - about Teddy Roosevelt's family and childhood. Fascinating.
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  #784  
Old 15 October 2008, 22:02
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The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe. For whatever reason my interest as of late has been turning to the "glory days" of NASA. I know that Wolfe didn't interview the astronauts, which is odd to me, but it is still a pretty good read so far. I've managed to pick up off of Amazon the edition of the book that has a ton of pictures.
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  #785  
Old 16 October 2008, 11:02
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Originally Posted by heavyguns1/1 View Post
The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger. Got it at Wally World for $5.00. Dull as shit so far, hopefully it picks up.
Most over-rated book in history, imo.
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  #786  
Old 16 October 2008, 13:28
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Most over-rated book in history, imo.
+1 I didn't find it that great.
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  #787  
Old 16 October 2008, 13:30
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I'm reading Panzer Commander by Hans von Luck a personal favorite of mine.
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  #788  
Old 16 October 2008, 19:33
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Mornings on Horseback by David McCulloch - about Teddy Roosevelt's family and childhood. Fascinating.
Strongly recommend this book for anyone interested in the make up of one of our greatest Presidents.
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  #789  
Old 16 October 2008, 19:45
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Winterdance by Gary Paulsen. A novice runs the Iditarod. I'm about half way through; so far it's a good read.
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  #790  
Old 22 October 2008, 16:34
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Reading two right now, both of which I would highly recommend.

The first is, "The Dirty Dozen, How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom." and "Undaunted Courage; Merriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson and the Opening of the American West."

Undaunted Courage is a great book that makes me nostalgic for the adventure/safari books I used to read as a kid. Incredible adventure, incredible exploration.
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  #791  
Old 22 October 2008, 17:17
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Undaunted Courage is a great book that makes me nostalgic for the adventure/safari books I used to read as a kid. Incredible adventure, incredible exploration.
+1; excellent book.
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  #792  
Old 22 October 2008, 18:24
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Undaunted Courage is a must read for American History buffs.
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  #793  
Old 22 October 2008, 19:50
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The Opening of the American West

I loved Undaunted Courage. Lewis and Clark will always be the American epic in the exploration of the American West.

But there is a whole generation of explorers who followed Lewis and Clark which very few people know much about. No matter how tremendous the Lewis and Clark expedition was (and it was), they had bad luck in picking about the worst place to cross the Rockies: the heart of the Bitterroot Mountains in Montana. Frankly, no one ever went that way again because it was too long, hard, and dangerous.

South Pass was the essential discovery that led to everything after. It was the one place where the Rockies can be crossed rather easily. It was actually "semi" discovered, ironically from West to East, by a band of fur trappers who were returning East after founding Astoria (at the mouth of the Columbia) in 1812. These brave explorers were on the payroll of John Jacob Astor, the rich New York businessman, who envisioned a commercial bonanza of western furs to be traded from their toehold on the Pacific via ships to the Orient. That never panned out, mostly because the British took over Astoria within a year of its founding and Astor incurred lots of losses that soured him from such an ambitious plan.

Then the war of 1812 stopped American westward exploration for almost a decade. During this time, all memory of South Pass was lost. It took a new breed of fur trapper and trader to make the effective discovery: Jedediah Smith and the mountain men of William H. Ashley. These fur men made friends with the Crow Indians east of the Wind River Mountains and then proceeded to discover South Pass, Bear River, Cache Valley, the Great Salt Lake, and more. Smith traveled south through Utah in 1826, down the Virgin River to the Colorado -- the first white men to see this river since the Spanish padres of the 1770s.

Smith proceeded west (from what is now Laughlin, Nevada) across the Mohave desert, crossed the San Bernardino mountains, and entered a paradise now known as California. The first Americans by land. He visited mission San Gabriel late that fall, visited the tiny settlement known as Los Angeles, traveled down to San Diego and was promptly held by the Mexican authorities as a spy. Soon released (thanks to some American ship owners visiting San Diego), he chose to take his men north (via Antelope Valley and the Tehachapi Mountains) into a verdant wilderness today known as the Central Valley of California. He encountered Indians in all these travels. A few were friendly, but many had serious designs on overwhelming his small band of fur trappers. What amazed Smith most about the California Indians was their extreme poverty in the midst of the natural abundance of the California Central valley and foothills. Smith observed dozens of Indian tribes, many as a “first contact”, and observed and wrote about them, years before they were affected by the white man and his vices.

He traveled north, constantly observing this massive wall of mountains to his East, today known as the Sierra Nevada. He was due back at the Bear River Rendezvous by July of 1827, so he took his men and tried to cross the Sierras via the American River. He was stopped by snow. Returning to the Valley, he dropped south and tried again with just two men this time. He made it through Ebbetts Pass, the first white man to accomplish a transit of the Sierras. He was also unlucky, in this case choosing a route across Nevada that was utterly barren. Had he gone further north he might have found the amazing Humboldt River – the true highroad of the West. He made it back to the Rendezvous, and amazed the trappers gathered there who had given him up for lost and/or dead.

There is more, a lot more, about Smith and the other amazing mountain men. They preceded the Oregon missionaries by at least a decade, and the Oregon Trail immigrants by roughly 20 years. They weren’t sponsored by the American government. Everything they did had to be paid for by their own hard work. Many died at the hands of Indians, including Smith himself when he was caught alone by Comanche Indians 5 years later.
But what they did really changed America.

For more on this reckless breed of men, check out:

http://www.amazon.com/American-Fur-T...4718648&sr=1-1
http://www.amazon.com/Life-Wild-Peri...4718695&sr=1-7
http://www.amazon.com/Majority-Scoun...4718741&sr=1-1
http://www.amazon.com/Across-Wide-Mi...4718770&sr=1-1

For more on Jedediah Smith, read the classic by Dale L. Morgan:

http://www.amazon.com/Jedediah-Smith...4718830&sr=1-1

And, in Jedediah’s own words:

http://www.amazon.com/Southwest-Expe.../dp/0803291973
http://www.amazon.com/Travels-Jededi...4718940&sr=1-1
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  #794  
Old 25 October 2008, 17:24
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* Chamberlain, Joshua L. (1992). The Passing of the Armies: An Account of the Final Campaign of the Army of the Potomac, Based upon Personal Reminiscences of the Fifth Army Corps. Bantam. ISBN 978-0553299922.

* Desjardin, Thomas A. (1995). Stand Firm Ye Boys from Maine: The 20th Maine and the Gettysburg Campaign. Thomas Publications. ISBN 1-57747-034-6....
Thanks for posting the list, some good titles to choose from here and also Biblioranger's additional titles.
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  #795  
Old 31 October 2008, 00:04
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Undaunted Courage is a must read for American History buffs.
+1!
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  #796  
Old 31 October 2008, 00:06
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Currently re-reading The Journey of Desire by John Eldredge.
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  #797  
Old 31 October 2008, 01:34
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Just finished the Conqueror series by Conn Iggulden (excellent books) and am now reading John Adams by David McCulloch
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  #798  
Old 31 October 2008, 07:00
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I just finished The Road by Cormac McCarthy (of which there is now a thread in the Lounge)....
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  #799  
Old 31 October 2008, 08:53
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I just finished The Road by Cormac McCarthy (of which there is now a thread in the Lounge)....
Did you enjoy it?


I just picked up (again) - Atlas Shrugged.
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  #800  
Old 31 October 2008, 09:51
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Reading the Iliad again.
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