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  #1  
Old 17 April 2018, 12:01
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Infectious Process

Since have been off work I have plenty of time to think about things above my pay grade.

So, I was thinking:

If cancer is not contagious, how does it spread within a body?
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Old 17 April 2018, 12:55
PatrickofSteele PatrickofSteele is offline
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The most basic answer I think is the following:

Something that's considered "contagious" or "infectious" is correlated to the capability of spreading a disease from one organism to another (I.E person to person). Things such as tuberculosis, the flu, meningitis all are highly contagious because they can be passed from person to person by contact, airborne particulates etc etc. The virus or bacteria is capable of essentially "jumping ship" from one person, landing on another person and able to infect another host organism.

The reason that it isn't contagious is that this is a cellular DNA problem, something that is specific to our body where the "cancer cells" aren't jumping ship and infecting another host. Essentially, even if a cancer cell from someone were to find a way into our blood stream, our immune system knows that this DNA doesn't match up and will kill it because it thinks it's a foreign attacker, similar to a flu virus except the flu virus has a better capability of surviving longer and replicating itself allowing it to live longer in our body until our immune system kicks it into high gear and kills the enemy virus.

So, your question:
Cancer itself is a cause of abnormal cell growth and division within the DNA structure which causes mutations within the cell body, and as the cells divide, mutations occur and are either destroyed or they are recognized by the immune system as abnormal and are killed. The reason that cancer spreads is that these cells can travel through the lymphatic system and/or the blood stream, or through direct penetration of the original cancer tumor into local organ systems (the stomach to the lungs or lungs to the liver) and essentially finds a new home and begins to replicate once it has entered into another portion of the bone.

So cancer isn't contagious in the terms of normal ideology of what we define "contagious" to be.. It just has the ability to move throughout our system and has the ability to wreck havoc on our body due to multiple methods of transportation within the body system.
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Old 17 April 2018, 12:57
PatrickofSteele PatrickofSteele is offline
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Sorry, the word bone in my previous message should be replaced with body.
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Old 17 April 2018, 16:45
Bronco Bronco is offline
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Nice explaination.
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Old 17 April 2018, 18:08
PatrickofSteele PatrickofSteele is offline
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Nice explaination.

appreciate it. l I figure if I have a masters in public health and I'm not using it in my professional career I might as well use it when the opportunity arises...
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Old 17 April 2018, 21:07
Hoggmedic Hoggmedic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickofSteele View Post
The most basic answer I think is the following:

So cancer isn't contagious in the terms of normal ideology of what we define "contagious" to be.. It just has the ability to move throughout our system and has the ability to wreck havoc on our body due to multiple methods of transportation within the body system.
When cancer cells or tumors are surgically removed, do you know if this increases the chance of spreading due to the surgical process? I understand risk vs. reward, however, I'm not sure if it's best just to leave it alone and treat it chemically or with radiation.
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Old 17 April 2018, 21:39
PatrickofSteele PatrickofSteele is offline
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Originally Posted by Hoggmedic View Post
When cancer cells or tumors are surgically removed, do you know if this increases the chance of spreading due to the surgical process? I understand risk vs. reward, however, I'm not sure if it's best just to leave it alone and treat it chemically or with radiation.
Yikes, I don't think I have an answer I wouldn't be B.S'ing for that one *my experience is only trauma/flight nursing/EMS and my masters focused on public health physical activity*


From what I've had to deal with for cancer patients is that it's so dependent on the type of cancer, the aggressiveness and the location of said cancer tumors. Oncologists are fortunately smart enough to be able to make that decision based on the differential diagnosis and findings to be able to say "yes, we're going under the knife to remove the tumor" or "no, this doesn't meet criteria so your best bet is radiation/chemotherapy.

I honestly wouldn't think that surgically removing a tumor cell would cause metastasis of cancer due to the procedure itself, but that's purely speculation..
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Old 18 April 2018, 14:44
57Medic 57Medic is offline
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Cancer spreads via the lymphatic system in some cases, by remote "seeding" in other cases. The usual suspects are brain, liver, lungs, and bone. Please keep in mind there are myriad types of cancers.
Cancer also is adept at feeding itself while stealing blood and nutrients from other organs via a process called angiogenesis, or new blood vessels. Cancers also grow at various rates, referred to as tumor doubling time.

Hope this helps
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Old 19 April 2018, 23:14
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https://www.sciencefriday.com/segmen...he-human-body/
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Old 20 April 2018, 06:34
8654maine 8654maine is offline
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Originally Posted by redneck View Post
No Go.

You have to add your input to this article.
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Old 20 April 2018, 07:47
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How does a society/govt put a man on the moon, send probes to the end of the planetary system, put rovers on Mars....But yet can't figure out cures for Cancer or Alzheimer's?
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Old 20 April 2018, 09:06
redneck redneck is offline
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Originally Posted by 8654maine View Post
No Go.

You have to add your input to this article.
https://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/the-interstitium-a-new-organ-that-could-explain-the-mysteries-of-the-human-body/
The link gets shortened. If you mouse over it pretty well describes it. Researchers have recently discovered a layer under the skin called the interstitium which may be the largest organ which would explain some missing links in medical theory like how cancer travels.
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Old 20 April 2018, 13:31
57Medic 57Medic is offline
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Originally Posted by 1RiserSlip View Post
How does a society/govt put a man on the moon, send probes to the end of the planetary system, put rovers on Mars....But yet can't figure out cures for Cancer or Alzheimer's?
$$$$$$
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Old 20 April 2018, 14:05
8654maine 8654maine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redneck View Post
https://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/the-interstitium-a-new-organ-that-could-explain-the-mysteries-of-the-human-body/
The link gets shortened. If you mouse over it pretty well describes it. Researchers have recently discovered a layer under the skin called the interstitium which may be the largest organ which would explain some missing links in medical theory like how cancer travels.
The interstitium is not a new discovery.

It's been in the textbooks for decades/forever.

There is a reason why lymph nodes are biopsied in certain cancers, such as breast and melanoma.
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Old 20 April 2018, 15:43
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Originally Posted by 57Medic View Post
$$$$$$
Your alluding to Big Pharma, right?
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Old 25 April 2018, 21:10
CAVmedic CAVmedic is offline
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Putting a man on the moon requires a canister filled with fuel and an airtight environment for the astronauts to survive in. Curing cancer (some forms are treatable) requires biochemical knowledge and manipulation of molecules comprised of thousands of different atoms. The amount of proteins, factors and cofactors, enzymes and associated molecules such as cyclins involved in cell replication literally consists of hundreds of molecules. The interactions between the molecular forces isn't fully understood. Even with cloud computing and state of the art chemistry software it's hard to pinpoint places where drugs can be effective. Getting into space requires a machine that could handle the forces we've know about for hundreds of years by watching shadows and dropping rocks. (Ok slightly more complicated)
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Old 26 April 2018, 13:31
57Medic 57Medic is offline
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Your alluding to Big Pharma, right?
Yes Sir
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