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  #1  
Old 6 June 2019, 17:42
foxcolt13 foxcolt13 is offline
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75th Anniversity of D-Day

I wish I could have gone to the D-Day memorial today in Bedford ,Va. I just saw on the news that VP Pense was there and they had a large crowd. I went there once with my dad years ago and saw it, its really nice. Rest in Peace to all the Hero's that were there on that historic day.
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  #2  
Old 6 June 2019, 18:37
Stretch Stretch is offline
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The Boys from Bedford VA and their hometown gave all they had...

https://beta.washingtonpost.com/hist...outputType=amp
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Old 6 June 2019, 18:58
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God Bless those brave souls who stormed the beaches, those who never left the beach and those who stormed on should be exalted for the mission they accomplished. Awesome courage under fire.
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Old 6 June 2019, 20:08
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My relative landed one hour into the invasion;116th Inf, K company.
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Old 6 June 2019, 23:34
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Mere words cannot begin to describe the honor, courage, and commitment of the men who stormed the beach and gave the last full measure of their devotion to free Europe.

I salute them all...
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Old 6 June 2019, 23:59
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Gods among mortal men...the solemn gospel of their combined courage and commitment shall outlive us all--and rightly so. God Bless them, each and every one.
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Old 7 June 2019, 00:17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mingo Kane View Post
Gods among mortal men...the solemn gospel of their combined courage and commitment shall outlive us all--and rightly so. God Bless them, each and every one.
I could not have said it better, I am humbled every time I think of the horrors so many have faced in battle, including many of you. How blessed we are because of men and women like these , yet so many will continue to mock their endeavors.
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  #8  
Old 7 June 2019, 22:52
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God Bless em all. They are getting fewer & fewer. I've talked to Rangers who stormed Point Du Hoc and the jungles of Burma.

Legendary experience.
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Old 8 June 2019, 00:20
schibbs schibbs is offline
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God Bless em all. They are getting fewer & fewer. I've talked to Rangers who stormed Point Du Hoc and the jungles of Burma.

Legendary experience.
I has been a few years since I talked with any WWII Rangers. Last ones I got to talk to were Ben Dafoe (RIP) and Earl Morris (RIP).Both Darby's Rangers. Humbling....

Last edited by schibbs; 8 June 2019 at 00:29.
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Old 8 June 2019, 03:12
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We also need to remember that the war did not start on 6 June and did not end on 7 June.

Still the largest battle American forces have ever fought was in the Meuse-Argonne in World War One.

Remember them all.
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  #11  
Old 8 June 2019, 08:29
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Originally Posted by 1RiserSlip View Post
God Bless em all. They are getting fewer & fewer. I've talked to Rangers who stormed Point Du Hoc and the jungles of Burma.

Legendary experience.
Did the same thing at one of their reunions--the 75th put on a static display, dinner, everything at Hilton Head. Then sitting around the hotel that night listening to those Rangers reflect on their personal experience. Words fails me...humbling doesn't provide enough justice.
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Old 8 June 2019, 09:56
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I helped a WW2 veteran years ago with his ID card, DEERS. He came ashore D-Day + 1,2nd ID.
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  #13  
Old 8 June 2019, 10:09
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Originally Posted by Stretch View Post
The Boys from Bedford VA and their hometown gave all they had...

https://beta.washingtonpost.com/hist...outputType=amp
My father was from Bedford. His younger brothers and sisters went to school with all of them and he knew the families. It really hit the area hard.
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  #14  
Old 8 June 2019, 12:06
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A D-Day story told by my fist Battalion Cmdr in the 1/502 Inf:

As told by Ltc. H.D. Kuhl. In the early 60’s Lt. Kuhl was a Platoon Leader in an Airborne Company in Alaska. At the time several of his soldiers were veterans of Airborne Operations in WWII to include the Normandy invasion. This story was related to Lt. Kuhl by one of these veterans.

As a 17 year old he made the night jump into Normandy. First the US Navy fired on the transport aircraft and several were damaged. After crossing the coast of France much more flak was encountered and it sounded like hail on a tin roof as it hit their aircraft. At this point an Air Force crewman approached our story teller and told him that they had a ‘refusal to jump’ in the forward part of the aircraft and suggested that they take him with them when they jumped. Furthermore, if the ‘refuser’ was returned to England the entire flight crew would be grounded until the ‘refuser’s’ Court Martial, and unavailable to resupply the Airborne forced in France. Our 17 year old story teller and his buddy agreed to accept the task and moved to a position in the stick next to the refusal.



The appropriate lights come on and the troopers start shuffling out of the aircraft. The recusal isn’t budging so our two guys grab him in the dark cabin in an effort to get him out the door. Well the refusal has no intention of going out of the aircraft and fights tooth and nail against all efforts to get him to the door. The plane is now empty and moving rapidly away from the drop zone. Over the next five minutes the two guys fight the refuser and most likely break all if his fingers stomping his hands off of the aircraft seats as he struggles to stay away from the door. Finally, our two guys get the screaming refuser out of the aircraft and follow him out the door. Our 17 year old slams into the ground almost immediately following the opening shock of his parachute.


He eventually got sorted out and tried to establish contact with fellow paratroopers with his clicker. After several attempts and no response, he made the decision to stay put until daylight. Just after daylight he once again used his clacker in an attempt to make contact with fellow troopers. Again, he got no response. As he raised to his knees to look around, Bam, he took a center of mass shot in the back. The rest of the day was spent in and out of consciousness. About mid-afternoon and troops from the invasion beach found him and took him via stretcher back to the beach. By nightfall he was on a ship back to England and within 24 hours in a hospital.


After three weeks and a surgery or two he was encouraged to get up and walk around and start getting his energy back. On his first walk around the hospital grounds who does he discover pulling weed in a flower bed but the ‘refuser’ he and his buddy had thrown out of the aircraft. So, our 17 year old asks where he was hit and why was he fucking around in a flower bed. Our ‘refuser’ responded that he was not hit, as he did not jump and was in fact on work detail while awaiting Court Martial for not jumping. Our 17 year old says ‘bull shit’ we through you out of the aircraft then jumped ourselves. Our ‘refuser’ responds, “That wasn’t me that you threw out, it was an Air Force crewman, who did not have a parachute, and the Air Force is pissed!”
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Old 8 June 2019, 13:11
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OMFG
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  #16  
Old 8 June 2019, 13:35
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Cute story.
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  #17  
Old 8 June 2019, 14:24
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LTC Kuhl passed recently. User MichaelA passed that story on to me. He was a Cpt. on Ltc. Kuhl's staff when I was there. (Doesn't post a whole helluva lot. An EOD guy in Nam & EOD Contractor post service. So, you know he's not all there.)
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  #18  
Old 9 June 2019, 15:03
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My wife had an uncle who landed at Utah with the Signal Corp attached to 1st Engineer Special Brigade. I'm not sure which wave he was in but I do know he served through 43-45 in Normandy, the Ardennes, and the beginning of Occupied Germany. He passed a few ago in his early 90's.
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  #19  
Old 10 June 2019, 06:39
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Ran into a WWII Navy Vet at the Airport on the way to France. He was on Destroyers in the Pacific.
Lost 2 brothers on D-Day and he goes over each year to pay honer to them. At 95 he was a spry guy and full of spunk and I wished we were seated together so I could talk with him more.
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  #20  
Old 10 June 2019, 07:29
Michael A. Michael A. is offline
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Squad Leader Normandy

In the early to mid-60’s my dad and some of his buddies established a gun club in our home town. One of the primary ranges was 300 meters as I recall. I was Jr. High – early High School age at the and learned to shoot an M1 on this range. Once I got the hang of it, I was shooting competition with the grown-ups. In order to pay my range and entry fees I volunteered to ‘past-up’ the targets between rounds of shooters. This was accomplished by sitting behind the target berms during rounds of shooting and coming out during cease fires to score and past-up the targets. This was a two-man job and I was always accompanied by an adult.

One Sunday afternoon I am behind the berms with one of my dad’s buddies and he starts pointing out the different sounds that bullets make when they pass by, go overhead; or strike the berms as well as telling how near or far the round was when it passed by. I inquired as to how you know this sort of stuff and he says, ‘Normandy.’ Note: Unbeknownst to me at the time the knowledge shared that day proved quite useful later in life!

Rodger starts talking about being in the Army and all that that implies. He was a Squad Leader; in I believe he 29th Inf. Div. A week or so prior to D-Day his unit is on a road march and he is hit by a drunk driver and winds up in the hospital. Just prior to loading the ships for the Channel crossing his squad comes and snatches him out of the hospital. Once out at sea it is discovered that his buddies have brought his B-Bag with Class A’s as opposed to his A-Bag with his field uniforms and TA-50. (field gear) To avoid the spectacle of their Squad Leader going ashore at Normandy in either a Hospital gown and pajamas or Class A’s they roamed around the ship sourcing, scrounging, arranging (pick the appropriate word) tactical uniform items, boots, helmet, field gear and a weapon for him.

Another example of the Greatest Generation
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