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  #61  
Old 26 February 2015, 10:25
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Originally Posted by Dark Helmet View Post
I did the same thing. Best company benefit..... Especially early in your civilian career..... Totally helped out at a period in my life when money was tight.
same here...

100% of my MBA was paid for by my employer..

about 90% of my JD is going to be paid by my employer (currently enrolled)

absolutely the best benefit my company offers..

I am amazed that so few people where I work take advantage of it (less than 3% of the staff that are eligible for the benefit are actually pursing degrees, certifications, etc.. that the company will pay for)..
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  #62  
Old 26 February 2015, 11:30
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I am amazed that so few people where I work take advantage of it (less than 3% of the staff that are eligible for the benefit are actually pursing degrees, certifications, etc.. that the company will pay for)..
My experience has been that many people avoid this due to the employer commitment that comes along with it (ie. required to maintain employment for x years after financial assistance concludes). And with many of said agreements, if the employee leaves early, there is a percentage (if not all) that must be paid back to the company; often in the form of a lump-sum payment, which most would not be able to afford.

At least this is what I've seen in the healthcare industry.

To anyone looking at these options, my advice would be, as with most things, to always read the fine print and know what you are getting in to.
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  #63  
Old 26 February 2015, 12:25
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^^^ agree ^^^

Most of what you are going to study as a Finance major is corporate finance.. which has little application to financial planning.. (assuming youre talking about personal financial planning or helping small businesses with financial planning, etc..)..

If I were going the Financial Planner route.. I'd consider an accounting major.. or general business degree.. and then seek out the CFP certification (probably more important than the degree honestly in that particular career field.. it would be hard to get a job with a reputable firm without the degree.. but even harder to get a job without the certification)..

I'm going to second what both MDWest and SB have said. At least with a Business Degree you won't be pigeon-holded to that line of work should you decide the Financial Planner route isn't right for you.
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  #64  
Old 26 February 2015, 15:05
havok88 havok88 is offline
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Sounds good. I emailed Edward Jones about the FORCES program and will see what info I get from them about that. It doesn't look like they require a degree if you apply that way but I don't know for sure yet. My instinct tells me I would be better off starting school anyway rather than continuing to put it off. I know a lot of people like AMU. Have any of you been through their business program and have any opinions on it?
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  #65  
Old 26 February 2015, 16:14
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I know a lot of people like AMU. Have any of you been through their business program and have any opinions on it?
I am three weeks away from completing the MBA(management) thru AMU. I have no complaints. Some of the classes are real ball busters(Applied decision making, Quantitative Analysis) but I do not have any experience(real world or education) to compare it to and not sure how it will be accepted. I do know AMU business school is ACBSP and not AACSB accredited and that may be the deal breaker.
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  #66  
Old 26 February 2015, 16:33
Armitage12 Armitage12 is offline
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...accreditation problems.
Now, I cant even get Excelsior to accept the Sociology course that I took from Henley-Putnam.
Big waste of time and tuition money.

Was the sociology a general requirements course, or was it central to the degree program you were taking at H-P? Did they say what the problem with the transfer entailed?
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  #67  
Old 26 February 2015, 20:34
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Originally Posted by mdwest View Post
same here...

100% of my MBA was paid for by my employer..

about 90% of my JD is going to be paid by my employer (currently enrolled)

absolutely the best benefit my company offers..

I am amazed that so few people where I work take advantage of it (less than 3% of the staff that are eligible for the benefit are actually pursing degrees, certifications, etc.. that the company will pay for)..

Ok, where are these companies you guys work for?! My current employer gives you a minor pay raise if you complete a certification off of an approved list, and it has to pertain to your functional area. Nothing like an MBA or JD though.
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  #68  
Old 26 February 2015, 23:06
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Ok, where are these companies you guys work for?! My current employer gives you a minor pay raise if you complete a certification off of an approved list, and it has to pertain to your functional area. Nothing like an MBA or JD though.
How big is your company?

The ones that I have seen have hundreds to thousands of employees.

That being said, these days most progressive corporations want to educate their people.

In healthcare, "magnet" status can be achieved through percentage of degreed employees. Aka, the hospital banks PR and accreditation off of its investment, which in turn can increase traffic to the facility ($$); and with the quid pro quo of the employee agreeing to work x years after, it increases the likelihood of retention, decreasing turnover, and saving the corporation money. Spend a little to make some.

I've also seen these programs in educational systems like school districts and the like, or major financial and insurance firms.

Usually places where advancement often requires formal education.
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  #69  
Old 27 February 2015, 10:35
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Originally Posted by O_Pos View Post
My experience has been that many people avoid this due to the employer commitment that comes along with it (ie. required to maintain employment for x years after financial assistance concludes). And with many of said agreements, if the employee leaves early, there is a percentage (if not all) that must be paid back to the company; often in the form of a lump-sum payment, which most would not be able to afford.
My experience as well. In my case, three years retention after graduation or a pro-rata payback.

Easily worth it.
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  #70  
Old 27 February 2015, 11:10
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Originally Posted by O_Pos View Post
How big is your company?

The ones that I have seen have hundreds to thousands of employees.

That being said, these days most progressive corporations want to educate their people.
My company is relatively small.. between 100-200 people globally..

the executive team is very progressive, sees value in an educated workforce.. and is willing to make the investment (within limits).. we have pretty robust benefits package compared to most smaller organizations.. the owners dont mind making that investment.. which is one of the things that initially attracted me to the company.. and one of the things that has kept me there even when given options to go elsewhere when opportunities for advancement, higher pay, etc.. have presented themselves..

there are other organizations out there that take similar positions... you just have to go look for them..

all of that said.. I dont want to be misleading.. my company wouldnt have come off the full tuition for a Harvard MBA or a Tulane JD, etc.. our program has an annual cap on how much tuition reimbursement an employee can receive.. so I have spent quite a bit of time and energy finding "the right" school that I could make fit, and keep my out of pocket expenses minimal, while still getting a reasonable education from an at least somewhat credible institution in the process..

In the case of my MBA, I found a distance program provided through a brick and mortar, accredited school in the UK.. that is pretty much on par with what many state/public schools in the US provide in their distance programs.. that was literally about half the cost of what most schools in the US would have charged..

I dont have an Ivy League MBA hanging on the wall...

But.. I did end up with an MBA.. that cost me exactly $0.00 of my own money to obtain.. by going that route.. (not too bad a deal in my opinion)...
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  #71  
Old 27 February 2015, 11:12
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My last two employers provided tuition assistance benefits from Day 1 of employment ($5,250 a year). The first company was fairly strict about the major being related to the nature of the company's operations so I went with an online degree in management. I ended up getting an online Bachelor's and then Master's and they both were fully covered by the tuition assistance money. Certainly, I did not go to any fancy school but I also did not have to pay out of pocket. I had to stay with the company for a year after the program completion date so I did not have to pay the prorated amount back.

The second company was much more liberal in terms of applicability of selected training/education to the actual job duties. For example, they had zero questions about covering TFG's CARVER training for me. They also paid for 3/4 of my second online Master's degree, until I had to stop taking classes. They covered MatLab classes for our ORSA guys and sent a couple of my managers to Six Sigma prep courses. Pretty much, as long as the employee could make some sort of justification of how their newly obtained knowledge can benefit the organization, they were game. Similarly to the first company, they had a one year commitment rule, however, when we lost the contract and had to lay off several of my team members, they did not ask them to pay back the tuition money, since their separation was not voluntary.

As a supervisor, I always felt like the best thing I could do for my people is to inspire and encourage them to go and get some schooling on the company's dime. Tuition assistance is the best benefit that an organization can offer, IMO. Free education is a gift, use it and abuse it.
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  #72  
Old 27 February 2015, 11:31
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I paid for my MBA with a combination of post 9/11 gill bill and money out of my own pocket(about 50/50). My current company does not have education benefits but managers (like me) press the CEO on the issue. The closest thing we have been able to get from HQ is a "maybe" on PMP certs.

I would love to keep going with my education...maybe forensic accounting.. But can't really afford to do it by myself any more.

The point is to keep moving forward with education, what ever it is.
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  #73  
Old 27 February 2015, 11:40
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Do some research as there are a number of employers that have strong ties to top 25 MBA programs. These employers will send you through the Executive MBA program at no cost to you. Be advised, they only send a select few as they are highly competitive slots, and you'll have to work your ass off. Also it was my observation that most of the selected candidates had very strong undergraduate degrees from very good schools and were considered the best and brightest within the company. My wife, who has an engineering undergraduate degree from a ranked school in Latin America, was selected to attend and graduated from the Simon School which is a top 25 MBA. In 1999, this was valued at $70,000k and she paid $0.0. Moreover, her employer gave her Fridays off so she could go to her class. We were married for a year when she started attending, needless to say she had very little spare time between work and school so my golf game got quite good over the two years of the program.
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  #74  
Old 27 February 2015, 21:23
Ex-PH Ex-PH is online now
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Originally Posted by 10thvet View Post
I would love to keep going with my education...maybe forensic accounting.. But can't really afford to do it by myself any more.
Same here. I'd love to get an MBA, but since I screwed myself out of my GI Bill, I'm stuck paying for my undergrad and can't afford an additional $60k in debt right now.
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  #75  
Old 28 February 2015, 09:47
Chemical Cookie Chemical Cookie is offline
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I'd love to get an MBA
Ex-PH,

I'm in the same boat as you. I finish my MDY at Norwich around the end of this year and will have used up all of my Post 9/11 GI Bill. At the same time, I'm studying for the GMAT and submitting applications for two online-ish top 15 MBA programs. One is $150k and the other is $100k. Not too excited about fronting this on my own (single income earner for the fam and all), but when I spoke with the admissions advisers, there are a surprisingly number of grants, scholarships, programs for the veteran community to help pay for b-school. So far I'm in the early stages of my research, but when I find out more I'll be sure to pass it along. Might be worth the research and time if you are interested.
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  #76  
Old 28 February 2015, 23:20
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Ex-PH, So far I'm in the early stages of my research, but when I find out more I'll be sure to pass it along. Might be worth the research and time if you are interested.
I appreciate it, thanks. Do any of the schools you researched offer full time online programs? I'm a single dad, so finding time to do the brick and mortar route is a bit difficult.
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  #77  
Old 2 March 2015, 09:13
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I'll put in a plug for AMU. I finished my masters there three years ago. I teach high school and received a decent pay raise. My daughter did her undergrad at a BM state school but her MBA at AMU. She got a great job with it and getting a promotion into management soon. Her husband also is an AM U grad and works as a contractor for NCIS.

Between the two, they make a quarter million a year. Not bad for online degree holders.
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  #78  
Old 2 March 2015, 11:22
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Originally Posted by O_Pos View Post
In healthcare, "magnet" status can be achieved through percentage of degreed employees. Aka, the hospital banks PR and accreditation off of its investment, which in turn can increase traffic to the facility ($$); and with the quid pro quo of the employee agreeing to work x years after, it increases the likelihood of retention, decreasing turnover, and saving the corporation money. Spend a little to make some.

I've also seen these programs in educational systems like school districts and the like, or major financial and insurance firms.

Usually places where advancement often requires formal education.
One of our flight nurses works at the local university hospital. They're paying more than 80% of the bill for her graduate degree as a Nurse Practitioner. Not even at their own school. She only has to work a .6 (part-time) to keep qualified for the assistance; and they don't even require that she stay on/pay back when she's done. Can't do much better than that.

Some state university systems may allow for an employee or family member to get tuition paid if attending a school within the system. When my wife was a resident at a state university hospital (making her an employee of the university system), that qualified me for tuition in any state school in any program. In today's economic climate, that may have been cut back some.

As for degrees on-line: I did an undergraduate degree online. That route is a lot more writing intensive, and required participation online in fora and discussions. I didn't enjoy it much, but it did mean I could get it done in the wee hours when I had time. I learned to really hate conforming to APA writing style requirements. Because I went to a reputable school (which has since changed, from what I hear), it gave me what I needed to then continue on at the local university. Back then, online schools were more inclined to give academic credit for military schools and even certain 'experiences' and foreign academic credit. That got me significantly ahead. (Getting woken from a nap by a frontal attack on an isolated position didn't get credit for The Psychology of Fright. Can't blame a guy for trying.)

Last edited by Medic09; 2 March 2015 at 11:29.
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  #79  
Old 2 March 2015, 17:40
Crucible guy Crucible guy is offline
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I haven't seen anything posted yet on the Jack Welch Management Institute through Strayer. I am in the MBA program now and yes it is online. I feel it is comparable to a brick and mortar school. It seems to be well respected in industry and is accredited by just about every accrediting body. If you are thinking about it, I highly recommend it.

CG
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  #80  
Old 2 March 2015, 21:47
Armitage12 Armitage12 is offline
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Some state university systems may allow for an employee or family member to get tuition paid if attending a school within the system..... In today's economic climate, that may have been cut back some.
Mine offers 80% discount for family members, but we are strictly warned that this is taxable (i.e. the benefit has to be reported and accounted for in the taxes). So a good route to go, but be cautious.


Quote:
Back then, online schools were more inclined to give academic credit for military schools and even certain 'experiences' and foreign academic credit. That got me significantly ahead. (Getting woken from a nap by a frontal attack on an isolated position didn't get credit for The Psychology of Fright. Can't blame a guy for trying.)
We are currently evaluating 'prior life experiences for credit' at my state institution. We'll see how it goes, but I'm not optimistic that it will be handled well. It comes down to attempting to get nontraditional students to come in for a partial degree, so that the university can generate an additional revenue stream. The practice came (in part) out of the proliferation of credit awarded for military training that we chose to award to veterans--for example, granting class credit for first aid/medic training. [To be clear, I have no issue with military training credit being awarded, since it usually isn't in-major or it is utterly appropriate, like languages].

Above all, before you pay anything, make sure your online program is accredited with the appropriate bodies. If in doubt, research to see what major employers in your state consider to be appropriately accredited. That can include contacting the state's Board of Regents or Board of Education, or locating that information online. It can also take the form of a negative list--the list of online institutions (including some overseas) that public employers in states are not permitted to recognize for hiring and promotion.

You should also (if you are enrolled in an institution and are considering pulling in online courses too) find out what articulation and transfer agreements exist. There usually is an administrator whose job it is to know about this, so persistence can pay off in poking about. It may also save you the anguish of taking something only to find out that the university won't accept it.
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