SOCNET

Go Back   SOCNET: The Special Operations Community Network > Employment and Training > Professional Development and Education

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 1 November 2011, 23:41
John6719's Avatar
John6719 John6719 is offline
?
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: MN
Posts: 1,265
Advice on career move

Would like the advice from some of the people on this board that are far more experienced than I am (which is likely 90% of you).

Situation:

I came back from deployment about 10-11 months ago. The position I had previously held had to be back filled while I was gone. When I came back, I was (basically) offered a new job--a promotion really. I gratefully accepted the position and overall like it. It isn't my ideal job, has a fair amount of stress (which isn't necessarily a bad thing--stressless jobs I think are boring), and is very much a "good" job.

About a month or two ago, what I would call my "ideal" job opened up. At the time I talked to my boss about it and told him I was interested. He was careful in his words, but I basically understood him to say he would be very disappointed if I left my current role after only being in it (at the time) 9 months. My boss had always (and still does) treated very well and I respect him for that. The company is great to work for and has always treated me top notch.

Question:

Do I pursue the new role, which is within the company, or do I stick it out in my current role? I hate burning bridges and I would really like to see some of the things I'm currently working on through to the end, but when I think about it, there will always be a new 'issue' that I'll want to see through to the end... Is 11 months too short to be in a role before moving on? Does the fact that I only took my current role because my previous position was unavailable after deployment hold any consideration?

I had made the decision that I was just going to stick it out in my current role, but then I talked to our HR gal today about something unrelated and she mentioned the hiring manager for this new position had asked about me and was wondering if I was going to apply--on multiple occasions. He met me at a large sales meeting where I had to present (I'm a service guy) and seemed to like me I guess.

Probably a weird question, but I look forward to reading any insight from the members of this site. Alway have respected your views on things.
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw

"OK, thankfully my wife doesn't read SOCNET -- something to do with it being filled with likeminded, immature people. Fuck her." - SOTB
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 1 November 2011, 23:56
Hostile0311 Hostile0311 is offline
Ne Obliviscaris
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Malta
Posts: 2,391
You have to be true to yourself. I've been in the same situation. I had a long talk with my (then) boss, and while he hated to see me go, he understood. You gotta do what's best for you in the long run. Don't ever let your dreams turn into regrets.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 2 November 2011, 06:03
tooslow tooslow is offline
Morte et une dame
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Smokey Joe's Cafe
Posts: 3,235
As a manager, I never held anyone back from advancing their position, regardless of the adverse effect on my operation.
__________________
'Living on the edge... of being banned from SOCNET'
Welcome to my family; do NOT make me kill you.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 2 November 2011, 09:59
CAMedic CAMedic is offline
On the Extract Bird
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Liberal CA
Posts: 262
A good manager preps his people to move up.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 2 November 2011, 10:24
CCo275's Avatar
CCo275 CCo275 is offline
Odin's Underling
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,510
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAMedic View Post
A good manager preps his people to move up.
Exactly. A GOOD manager prepares you to move up. A poor manager tries to guilt you into staying so you can continue to make his job easier and make him look good. If you are qualified and it's the job you really want then do it. Don't ever hold back. Even if you don't get it at least you will know you tried and will be better prepared the next time it comes open.

Best of luck to you.
__________________
For those who have fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know. RLTW!

Quote:
TURD POSer Biondi: My name likely won’t be listed, as I led a covert operation of wet-teams.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 2 November 2011, 11:36
Slinger17516's Avatar
Slinger17516 Slinger17516 is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Conus
Posts: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hostile0311 View Post
You gotta do what's best for you in the long run.
x 1000...

Think of it the other way...if times got tough and your boss/employer/company was in a spot where they would take a financial hit by keeping you on board do you think they would? Just to be nice? Of course they wouldn't...

If you have a chance to go after your ideal job then do it...you might not have the opportunity to do so again...lastly, if you do your job through the transition (expressing gratitude, thanks for the job you had, and etc etc) then you are not the one burning the bridge IF it comes to that...anything negative after you acting diligent and professional upon leaving is on that employer, not you...
__________________
"It often requires more courage to dare to do right than to fear to do wrong."

Abraham Lincoln
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 2 November 2011, 12:07
Realist Realist is offline
No Title
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: The Commonwealth
Posts: 222
This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Hamlet Act 1, Scene 3

Polonius was a wise old man. Go for the ideal...
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 2 November 2011, 12:19
Thirtyaughtsix's Avatar
Thirtyaughtsix Thirtyaughtsix is offline
Above my paygrade
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Alabama
Posts: 89
Agree with the others. Your current manager should take pride in the fact he's set his subordinates up for success. Go for it.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 2 November 2011, 13:01
Massgrunt's Avatar
Massgrunt Massgrunt is offline
Policeman Officer
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Day shift.
Posts: 12,278
So is this guy going to put food on your table and a roof over your family's head?
__________________
"The real problem was being able to stick it out, to sit in an office under the orders of a wee man in a dark gray suit and look out of the window and recall the bush country, the waving palms, the smell of sweat and cordite, the grunts of the men hauling jeeps over the river crossings, the copper-tasting fears just before the attack, and the wild, cruel joy of being alive afterward. To remember, and then go back to the ledgers and the commuter train, that was impossible. He knew he would eat his heart out if it ever came to that."

- "The Dogs of War" by Frederick Forsyth
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 2 November 2011, 14:03
GirlwithaGlock's Avatar
GirlwithaGlock GirlwithaGlock is offline
Russian Tycoon
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Ottery St Catchpole
Posts: 3,450
Go for the "dream job".

One thing that can make your manager feel less bitter about you leaving for a new opportunity is a good transition plan. If you do the knowledge transfer to your replacement, your manager will feel more confident about the business not suffering after your departure.

I had a similar situation a few months ago and I took the "dream job" within the same company although I had only been in the previous position for six months. My PM was visibly upset but she felt a little better about it after I mentored the person who took my position.
__________________
Dodge This!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 2 November 2011, 14:06
txb&b txb&b is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas
Posts: 588
As bad as you may feel about leaving your current manager in a lurch, do what's best for the company and for yourself. You've acknowledged that the position is ideal for you. In addition, the hiring manager has inquired multiple times about whether you were going to apply for a position that has remained open for 1 to 2 months - very indicative that they think you are ideal for that position and may very well be holding that position open for you to apply. Even though he'll "regret" losing a good employee, if your current manager is a good one then he'll understand that it's in everyone's best interest for you to pursue this.

Good luck
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 2 November 2011, 14:06
Slim's Avatar
Slim Slim is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 747
He sounds like he's more wrapped up in his own ego rather that looking out for his people. One of his main objectives should be for his subordinates to move on and excel within the company.

When I was in a leadership position I always took it as a point of personal pride when my employees moved on to bigger and better things. Particularly if they were asked for by name.
__________________
The longer I live, the more I read, the more patiently I think, and the more anxiously I inquire, the less I seem to know... ~ John Adams
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 2 November 2011, 16:01
g6445v g6445v is offline
El Conquistador
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: OCONUS
Posts: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAMedic View Post
A good manager preps his people to move up.
right on...well said...
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 2 November 2011, 17:20
Apache Apache is offline
Confirmed User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 86
Go for the promotion.
As previously stated--
Do you think if the situation was reversed your Mgr would be a "nice guy ?"
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 2 November 2011, 17:54
Tracy's Avatar
Tracy Tracy is offline
Been There Done That
 
Join Date: Feb 1997
Location: West
Posts: 11,148
Did you ask your boss 'why' he would be disappointed?

Did you ask if there's a chance to re-visit the 'dream' job in the near future?

What's the ground truth?
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 2 November 2011, 19:29
John6719's Avatar
John6719 John6719 is offline
?
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: MN
Posts: 1,265
After thinking about it last night and today, I have come to the same consensus as everyone's advice on here. I'll set up a time to discuss with my boss (likely) tomorrow and also get my resume updated.

To Tracy's questions:

I didn't handle the first conversation with him the way I should have. He implied things, talked around subjects, and wasn't very direct. I was fairly sure I was picking up what he was laying down, but never confronted him on it. I should have said "so what you're saying is.....?", but I didn't (Ass U Me). This was very shortly after being presented with a decent raise (outside of any merit increase or promotion, just a you're underpaid for the job you're doing type of thing) that he had put me in for. I didn't want to make waves at the time (I'm over that now....).

There is always the possibility of a revisit in the future. There aren't a ton of positions in my area in this particular field, so it would likely be a while.

Ground truth, I was worried how it would look to many others in my current "CoC" if I were to leave. I have made a decent name for myself (which doesn't take much these days) and didn't want to piss anyone off with a "I just did _____ for you and this is how you treat me?" --That's kind of silly looking back, I would never think that of one of my guys, so I don't know why I think anyone above me would think that.

Appreciate the advice all!
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw

"OK, thankfully my wife doesn't read SOCNET -- something to do with it being filled with likeminded, immature people. Fuck her." - SOTB
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 2 November 2011, 19:53
Massgrunt's Avatar
Massgrunt Massgrunt is offline
Policeman Officer
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Day shift.
Posts: 12,278
Try and stay in good terms with the guy obviously. Stroke his ego, without seeming to do so. Give him credit for the cool things he's done for you and part as friends.

I was in a situation a few years back where I turned down some attractive lateral opportunities because I didn't want to be "that guy". It turned into a disaster that I'd have been well clear of if I'd put my own interests first. I'll never forget that lesson.
__________________
"The real problem was being able to stick it out, to sit in an office under the orders of a wee man in a dark gray suit and look out of the window and recall the bush country, the waving palms, the smell of sweat and cordite, the grunts of the men hauling jeeps over the river crossings, the copper-tasting fears just before the attack, and the wild, cruel joy of being alive afterward. To remember, and then go back to the ledgers and the commuter train, that was impossible. He knew he would eat his heart out if it ever came to that."

- "The Dogs of War" by Frederick Forsyth
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 7 November 2011, 22:16
John6719's Avatar
John6719 John6719 is offline
?
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: MN
Posts: 1,265
So far so good. I know there is no guarantee with this new position, but so far things are looking good.

Appreciate the advice again. I'm pretty excited about it and hope it all pans out.
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw

"OK, thankfully my wife doesn't read SOCNET -- something to do with it being filled with likeminded, immature people. Fuck her." - SOTB
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11 November 2011, 11:49
doitforjonny doitforjonny is offline
pumpin gas and kickin ass
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: California
Posts: 848
If you are moving within the company, there is no way you should consider yourself disloyal. Especially if you specifically make yourself available to ease the transition at your old position. Make sure your current boss knows your replacement will have free access to you, and you will help bring him up to speed, even if you are at your new position.

If you don't look out for number one, someone else will be looking out for their number one.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11 November 2011, 14:05
John6719's Avatar
John6719 John6719 is offline
?
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: MN
Posts: 1,265
I'll be flying down to Choke's territory next week for the "firing squad"... Didn't get enough time scheduled in to stop for a beer, but I'll be back within a few weeks.
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw

"OK, thankfully my wife doesn't read SOCNET -- something to do with it being filled with likeminded, immature people. Fuck her." - SOTB
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Our new posting rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 21:17.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Socnet.com All Rights Reserved
© SOCNET 1996-2018