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Old 29 June 2008, 03:55
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Air Force Specialty Code

I did not know where to post this but I was looking a name on Mil.com and the MOS code come up J1C251. I tried looking it up but only came up with someone saying they were CCT. Would that be correct?
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Old 29 June 2008, 09:17
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Looks correct, 1C2XX is the generic CCT AFSC, don't know if they have the J prefix (little redundent in my view).
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Old 30 June 2008, 00:17
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Yes, "J" for jumper. There are actually three "AFSC's". Ah, wait, here is the Wikopedia explanation:

Quote:
During the course of their Air Force careers, Airmen sometimes switch jobs and receive multiple AFSCs to denote training in multiple specialties. A Primary AFSC (PAFSC) is the designation for the specialty in which the individual possesses the highest skill level and is, therefore, the AFS that he or she is best qualified to perform. The Duty AFSC (DAFSC) reflects the actual manpower position the Airman is assigned to. The Control AFSC (CAFSC) is a management tool to make assignments, assist in determining training requirements, and consider individuals for promotion. Often an enlisted Airman's PAFSC will reflect a higher skill level than his or her CAFSC since the CAFSC skill level is tied to rank while the PAFSC skill level is tied to performance and education.

The “normal” situation for most Airmen is for the PAFSC, DAFSC, and CAFSC to be the same; however, there are situations (retraining, special duties, Air Force-level changes and other situations either within or beyond an Airman's control) when the three will differ. Additionally, Airmen retraining into other specialties will acquire one or more Secondary AFSCs (2AFSC, 3AFSC, etc).
The "J" tells me it is his Duty AFSC and he is in a "J" coded manpower position.

1C251 is CCT. The "1" is Operations, the "C" is Command and Control Sysems, the "2" is his job, i.e. CCT, the "5" near the end stands for his "5" skill level (worker bee level, typically around the E-4 level and does not supervise anyone), and the "1" is for specialties within the career field. Not sure what the specialties are for CCT, but an example would be a "0" for support, an "1" for operations, etc.
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Old 19 July 2008, 21:04
Grand58742 Grand58742 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KJ View Post
Yes, "J" for jumper.
The "J" tells me it is his Duty AFSC and he is in a "J" coded manpower position.
FYI

Actually the "J" coding can be either a PAFSC, a DAFSC or both. Situation in case...My PAFSC is T3P071 (T for Trainer), however my DAFSC is 3P071 since I am not actively filling a Trainer position in my unit. The Primary AFSC will almost always match whatever the highest level of special certificatation the individual has, i.e. a Jump qualified CCT member should have a Primary AFSC of J1C2X1 even if they are not currently filling a billet which requires jump certification. If they are filling a billet which does not require jump certification, their Duty AFSC would simply be 1C2X1.

The Pre-Identifier on an AFSC (regardless of career field) is a special certification, much like an Special Educational Identifier (SEI) is.

As stated in your "Wiki" reference, the Duty AFSC can also match whatever the Primary AFSC is. However, it is not always normal for a Control AFSC to match the Primary or Duty AFSC. I used to do manpower numbers for my unit some years ago and found the CAFSC rarely matched the DAFSC.

For example, an A1C (E-3) who is awarded their 5 Level upon completion of the CDC End of Course can have a Duty AFSC of 3P051, but a Control AFSC of 3P031 until they put on E-4. Just as an E-5 can have a Duty AFSC of 3P071 and wear the appropriate function badge upon the awarding of the 7 Skill level but still be locked into a Control AFSC of 3P051 until they sew on E-6. It's a manpower, deployment and assignment thing, as you stated before. Either way, it is rarely paid any attention to as one can go up or down a Skill Level for deployment and (IIRC) PCS purposes.

Hope this clarifies things a bit.

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Old 19 July 2008, 23:08
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The CAFSC is initially based on the AFSC into which the airman is classified at the time of enlistment or during basic training. The DAFSC for enlisted personnel must match the CAFSC unless the enlisted Airman is on temporary duty (TDY) outside the CAFSC.

The must match the authorized unit manpower document (UMD) position is by skill level and not rank/grade. On Unit Manning Documents the breakdown the CAFSC will not exceed is as follows:
3-skill level for AB through A1C.
5-skill level for SrA and SSgt.
7-skill level for TSgts and MSgts.
9-skill level for SMSgts.

There is also the Primary Air Force Specialty Code (PAFSC). The PAFSC is the AFSC in which the individual is most qualified to perform duty. Prior to policy change ca. 1994 a MSgt meeting the eligibility requirements could be awarded the 9-skill level PAFSC.

Prefixes are authorized for use with AFSCs when there is a need to identify an ability or skill not restricted to a single utilization field or career field. A prefix used with the appropriate AFSC identifies manning document position requirements and individuals qualified to perform duty in the position.

Performing parachutist duties is an AFSC requirement for UMD DAFSCs listing Pararescue and CCT. Individuals performing duties of these AFSCs will always be in a J coded duty position. It is requirement for award and retention of the PAFSC and CAFSC.

Other duty positions on a UMD requiring qualification and performing parachute duties will have a J prefixed duty positions. What this means if the member transfers to a new position on a UMD not J coded the members DAFSC and CAFSC no longer have the J prefix.
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Old 20 July 2008, 00:49
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Christ. I thought the Navy had a confusing way of doing things.
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Old 20 July 2008, 07:17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guns View Post
Christ. I thought the Navy had a confusing way of doing things.
Actually its not. PAFSC/CAFSC/DAFSC tend to be the same or in process of upgrade training to be the same.

DAFSC is more connected to the manpower position authorized to a unit and capability assets needed to accomplish operations and missions more than it is to the individual.

CAFSC is equally connected to the funded force strength the individual for Air Force purpose of tracking having the right match of positions and people for those positions.

PAFSC is strongly connected to qualification of the member to do duties.

PAFSC and CAFSC are generally the same; the most common exceptions would be retraining situations or special duty assignments. Example where they would differ and not possible to happen under current policies is the E-7 awarded 9-skill level. I never was selected for promotion to E-8, but my PAFSC at retirement was Q1T290, my CAFSC was Q1T270 and my DAFSC was X1T270. (I got to look at my DD-214 to verify the X prefix). Prior to ca. 1992 it was possible for E-7 to meet requirements and be awarded 9-skill level. Can no longer get 9-skill level with out having E-8 grade.
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Old 20 July 2008, 10:57
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That 9-level for E-8's and above makes absolutely no sense to me. Does it make sense to you? Why did we go through all the hulabulu to add a stripe on our uniforms and put the E-7, as was told; "In the top 3", if we then took away their real power and hid this action by using an administrative classification on the PAFSC?
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Old 20 July 2008, 11:33
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KJ-the selected for promotion to E-8 now has a mandatory in-residence PME for eligibility to actually sew on the E-8 stripes. Back in our day PME was voluntary, but E-7 getting 9-skill level required completing the SNCO Academy either by correspondence or in-residence. Back then E-7 could go in-residence without being selected for promotion to E-8. I did by correspondence, Jon Smith and a few others went in-residence.

The AF has changed some since we retired.
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Old 20 July 2008, 19:26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johca View Post
KJ-the selected for promotion to E-8 now has a mandatory in-residence PME for eligibility to actually sew on the E-8 stripes. Back in our day PME was voluntary, but E-7 getting 9-skill level required completing the SNCO Academy either by correspondence or in-residence. Back then E-7 could go in-residence without being selected for promotion to E-8. I did by correspondence, Jon Smith and a few others went in-residence.

The AF has changed some since we retired.
As of last year (I believe) you have to have your CCAF degree completed prior to pinning on E-8 and 9 these days.....it's changing constantly.
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Old 28 July 2008, 13:07
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johca View Post
Can no longer get 9-skill level with out having E-8 grade.
Actually, it is still possible. I know quite a few E-7s wearing 9 Level Function Badges and have been awarded the 9 Level. I think now, kind of like how it was then, it's a time thing or waiverable more than the in residence PME thing.
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