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Old 5 March 2012, 15:06
BigBird BigBird is offline
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Icon5 Navy EOD prep

Hi all, I am a civi waiting for my turn to go to boot camp and then head out to dive school for Navy EOD training. I was just wondering, since I still have a few months left on my hands, what can I study now that will help me later?

I found a copy of the Navy Diving Manual online: http://www.scribd.com/doc/8162578/US...Revision-6-PDF

I have also thought about studying basic physics and electricity on my own. Good idea or not?

Thank You.
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Old 5 March 2012, 16:07
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1. Thanks for your interest and commitment for one of the most challenging career fields in the military.

2. Read through the back history of the EOD area. Lots of good info there. Just search "school" or "prep" etc....

3. Put down the books and stop studying. What you need to be doing is PT and a lot of it. Most of the guys who drop did not prepare physically. Have you been in the pool a lot? How long have you been swimming with fins- 3500 meters? Can you run 5 miles in 35 min or less? Do over 20 pull ups? Swim for 45 minutes strait? Get my drift?

4. I realize you can't PT all day every day. For your rest time read the physics and medicine chapters out of the dive manual. However- PT and water skill/comfort should be your main focus. Over 75% of the initial drops are for lack of physical prep and aquatic confidence reasons. about 10% for book stuff after the gut check. You do the math.

Best of luck.
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Old 5 March 2012, 17:03
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Lightbulb

my last PST was:

Swim 7:44
Push 105
Sit 111
Pull 27
Run 9:11

I do all the PT you listed. I work out of Stew Smiths Seals prep book and it seems to be working. Mostly I was just looking for something else to spend some time on to go the extra mile.

Thanks BMF!
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Old 5 March 2012, 17:13
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Those are good PST scores so you are looking good there. I look forward to verifying them .

Here's some more ideas to keep you busy.

Have you swam with fins for distance?
can you tread water (with fins) holding 25-30lbs for 2 minutes?
Can you swim with a snorkel but no mask (sounds easy but some people have problems with it).
Can you throw your mask in- swim down to it, put it on, and clear it?
Swim 50 meters with hands and feet tied (just fake it in practice).
These are just some of the things that will help you get ready.
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Old 5 March 2012, 17:23
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1. Fins for distance: check

2. Tread with 25-30lbs: great idea I'll get on it. Should I just hold the weights above my head with arms fully extended or is there a preferred method.

3. Snorkel: I'll talk to my coach about that, I'll need to borrow one.

4: Not sure how to clear a mask, I think I have seen this on some of the frog youtube stuff, looks fun. Is it where you guys go to the bottom and pick it up with your teeth and then do something with it?

5: 50 meter swim no prob. The thing I have been trying to get relaxed to do is what I saw on the show via youtube "Surviving the Cut", on the ep. about combat swimmers; is to get used to doing 50 meters underwater with no breath swims (I have a yd. pool so I push off again after the 50yd mark...not exact) and get used to bobbing up and down in the deep end, to the bottom and then back up, with hands and feet (faking in this case...I don't trust my local lifeguards) tied for 10min or so
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Old 6 March 2012, 02:03
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Hold the weight plate on your chest with arms crossed. It's good for developing fin strength.

clearing the mask is pretty easy- civilian SCUBA divers learn it as well. Tons of videos on you tube. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYvfl-Ylvf0

50 meter swim- fake the hands and feet tied (but be strict) and porpoise your way down.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnI8wE5fJXk
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  #7  
Old 6 March 2012, 13:40
BigBird BigBird is offline
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Golden web clips thank you.
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Old 6 March 2012, 16:47
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The Master Chief is giving good advice. Much of this should have been discussed with your Coordinator or Mentor. One more thing... Do not do breath holding evolutions. When the time comes, you will have been properly prepared.
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Old 6 March 2012, 17:57
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Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmf View Post
Can you throw your mask in- swim down to it, put it on, and clear it?
This ^^^

It was amazing how many guys we lost in dive school because this freaked them out. With all the other shit we had to do, this got them, which suprised the hell out of me (being a young/dumb underwater gold miner prior to enlistment).

I think you will do great, just a good thing to know how to do in advance!
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Old 6 March 2012, 19:47
BigBird BigBird is offline
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Wow, it didn't look that scary from the clip. Clearing my mask has just become a top priority. Thanks again Master Chief.

jw, did you mean don't practice the underwater swims?
Thank you.
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Old 7 March 2012, 16:34
Chainsaw Chainsaw is offline
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Practicing underwater swims on a breath-hold is a big no-no. Every now and then someone dies while conducting this type of training, because they were attempting it alone or without proper supervision.

"Shallow water blackout" is the technical term, and you can Google it or check out the NSW prep section of these forums; both have information on it.

Good luck.
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Old 7 March 2012, 17:05
BigBird BigBird is offline
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Thank you Chainsaw.
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Old 8 March 2012, 02:30
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What Chainsaw said.
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Old 8 March 2012, 08:38
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+1 on mask clearing, that took me a few tries, it freaks a lot of people out for some reason, and they are pretty picky; if you have any water in your mask at all it is a no-go. Attention to detail I guess. The number one killer though is treading with weight, because you have to perform a few tasks while doing it. Good luck to you man, it is a long process, but a lot of fun as well.
ML
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Old 9 March 2012, 01:52
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Never forget humility. Learn the history of our community. It's really interesting. And go to eodmemorial.org. Pay respects to all of the techs that have given their lives for this. When I sit on Senior boards, I always have the guys memorize all of the Navy techs that we've lost in Iraq and here. And it's bad if they don't remember Good luck. Do it for the right reasons. Just my $.02
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Old 9 March 2012, 08:13
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Know what each of the parts of the badge stand for. It's on the net.
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Old 9 March 2012, 08:23
Patrick7 Patrick7 is offline
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Take it one evolution, one day at a time. It's a long process but I am closer with the guys in my class then most people from back home. +1 to what Gator said. A lot of guys thought their shit didn't stink and were quickly humbled by the Instructors. Every guy there is (or should be) a pt stud, it was the teamwork and academic stuff the separated guys out, IMHO.

I'm barely a FNG but everyday I am reminded why I came to this community-great history, great mission, and some of the best people I have ever served with. Good luck.
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  #18  
Old 9 March 2012, 11:06
BigBird BigBird is offline
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Great info and suggestions, thank you all.
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  #19  
Old 9 March 2012, 15:53
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DISCLAIMER: I am not an EOD Tech, I was a Recon Corpsman. I taught 3yrs at NDSTC in Specialized Diving Division, which is EOD Diver, Marine Combatant Diver, and Recon Corpsman.

As a former NDSTC Instructor, I recommend 2 things:
1) PT - run and swim everywhere and every time you can without injuring yourself. Pushups, Flutterkicks, Situps, Lunges, etc - you should be able to accomplish big numbers without caring. While mentally reciting Boyle's Law for your Physics test that day. PT should be an afterthought, and not even on your mental agenda.

You will still get smoked, you will still puke, and you will still be at risk for heat injury. But you shouldn't be stressing about the timed runs that get progressively longer and faster. Give yourself that edge now; its the single factor that is 100% under your control.

2) Remember where you are and why you're there. During Spring Break, we lost 25% of our students across the board to non-academic attrition. That means fucking up out in town. Remember that you're there to do a job, and that job is to GRADUATE ON TIME. Not to enjoy Panama City Beach. Remind yourself that you have an opportunity other Sailors would kill for - don't throw it away over a local chickie.

Good luck, and stay motivated.
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Last edited by sarc88; 9 March 2012 at 16:08.
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  #20  
Old 9 March 2012, 18:09
BigBird BigBird is offline
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Wow Doc sarc88, I don't know if I should laugh or be afraid. This type of advice reminds me a lot of why I think my father wouldn't allow me to go to a coastal college...corn fields are good for studying, and more studying as he would say.

Thank you for the advice.
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